carbon fixation


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carbon fixation

n
(Botany) the process by which plants assimilate carbon from carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to form metabolically active compounds

carbon fixation

The process by which carbon from the atmosphere is converted into carbon compounds, such as carbohydrates, in plants and algae, usually by photosynthesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
obliquus, carried out every 24 hours for 7 days, were used as a proxy for carbon fixation.
In terms of carbon fixation, the inferred higher plant growth rate in H pastures was probably offset by longer plant residence time in L pastures.
A bio-fuel contains energy from geologically recent carbon fixation and is produced from living organisms.
Their cells possess cell walls, as plant cells do, but the structural material is subtly different, as is their mode of nutrition which is heterotrophic--that is, they don't rely on direct photosynthesis for their carbon fixation and synthesis of organic material.
During desiccation, in drought-tolerant species carbon fixation is endorsed through the control of stomatal function to improve water use efficiency and stomata open rapidly, when water deficit is relieved.
In a paper published earlier this year in PLoS Computational Biology, Eric Smith, a Santa Fe Institute External Professor and Santa Fe Institute Omidyar Fellow Rogier Brkman mapped the most primitive forms of carbon fixation onto major, early branching points in the tree of life.
It has a strong carbon fixation capability, and is mainly distributed in South and Southeast Asia, particularly in China (Wu & Raven, 2006).
A good starting point to illustrate this opportunity for business using carbon fixation is the system of natural protected areas of Mexico.
8) is no less fascinating than the ability of the mammalian liver to do the light-independent part of photosynthesis: carbon fixation.
Life requires the anabolic utilization of the products of carbon fixation.
Atmospheric carbon fixation associated with ecosystem degradation is estimated at nearly a billion tons from 1980 to 2003, (almost the equivalent of annual carbon dioxide emissions from the European Union) and emissions from the loss of soil carbon are orders of magnitude greater.