carbon sink


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carbon sink

or

carbon well

n
(Environmental Science) areas of vegetation, esp forests, and the phytoplankton-rich seas that absorb the carbon dioxide produced by the burning of fossil fuels
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Bamboo forests are a natural defense against calamity, as well as a carbon sink.
'Part of the carbon sink area focus will be to bring many other native species that can be found so eventually a large arboretum can be developed both for observation of specimen trees as well as potential seed sources in the future,' said William Granert, executive director of SWCF.
Plastic litter could impact the oceanic carbon sink
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- More than half of the carbon sink in the world's forests is in areas where the trees are relatively young -- under 140 years old -- rather than in tropical rainforests, research shows.
Forests have a critical role to mitigate climate change, he said, adding that jungles work as a carbon sink. Deforestation weakens this foremost carbon sink function, he said, and pointed out that it is estimated that 15 to 20 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions are the result of deforestation.
Forests are nature's own carbon sink and if protected and managed well, can increase the resilience of rural landscapes.
Lee Cheng-hsien , deputy director of Hulien Forest District Office, said the forest park has an area of 1,250 hectares, which is the equivalent of 48 times of the Daan Forest Park, and is therefore a huge carbon sink.
A carbon sink is an area, either artificial or natural, that absorbs greenhouse gases, particularly methane and carbon dioxide, or CO2.
The Cuvette Centrale peatlands in the central Congo basin is believed to be the world's largest peatland system, and the region's most important carbon sink. Carbon sinks are forests, oceans, or other natural locations that have the ability to absorb carbon from the atmosphere.
Study author Dr Trevor Keenan, from the US Department of Energy's Berkeley National Laboratory, said: "This highlights the need to identify and protect ecosystems where the carbon sink is growing rapidly."
During the past 50 years, the land-based carbon sink's "interannual variability" has grown by 50%100%.
"We've found a carbon sink in the most unlikely place," says Yan Li, an ecologist at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Urumqi.