carbon sink

(redirected from carbon sinks)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

carbon sink

or

carbon well

n
(Environmental Science) areas of vegetation, esp forests, and the phytoplankton-rich seas that absorb the carbon dioxide produced by the burning of fossil fuels
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The intended reduction in fuel wood usage will impact the health of forests and their capacity to act as carbon sinks and regulating air quality.
In particular they'll look at the exchange process called flux and gather information to help improve computer models of carbon sinks.
We can now start 'changing' our present fuel consumption in our power plants, transport system, buildings and homes, as well as the way we manage our industrial and municipal waste, including the way we protect our forest and oceans as the carbon sinks.
Forests can be carbon sinks because they use carbon dioxide in the process of photosynthesis, which is why tree-planting programmes are a popular way of offsetting emissions.
The future evolution of the carbon sinks is not well known, which inhibits robust quantification of future atmospheric CO2 concentration and the resulting climate change.
For more than half a century, people have been trying to understand why carbon sinks more here and less there.
If this process occurs elsewhere, desert aquifers may rank among the top three largest active carbon sinks on land, Li says.
In Uganda, 8000 people have been relocated to conserve carbon sinks, in the form of forests.
Carbon sinks are natural systems that drain and store CO2 from the atmosphere, with vegetation providing many of the key sinks that help chemically balance the world - such as the Amazon rainforest and the vast, circumpolar Boreal forest.
People always say we know carbon sinks are important for the climate," Shevliakova said.
Blue Carbon coastal ecosystems include mangrove forests, seagrass meadows and saltwater marshlands, which serve as carbon sinks.
Only half of the 375 billion tons of carbon released since 1750, the start of the industrial era, have been absorbed in carbon sinks such as oceans and forests.