carbon sink

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carbon sink

or

carbon well

n
(Environmental Science) areas of vegetation, esp forests, and the phytoplankton-rich seas that absorb the carbon dioxide produced by the burning of fossil fuels
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Forests are widely recognised as important carbon sinks -- ecosystems capable of capturing and storing large amounts of carbon dioxide -- but dense tropical forests, close to the equator have been assumed to be working the hardest to soak up these gases.
Every year, the Earth's natural carbon sinks such as forests soak up large amounts of CO2 produced by human activities.
"This is caused by emissions from fossil fuels, deforestation and cement production, and the increase would have been even larger if it were not for natural carbon sinks which soak up some of the excess carbon dioxide.
In particular they'll look at the exchange process called flux and gather information to help improve computer models of carbon sinks.
We can now start 'changing' our present fuel consumption in our power plants, transport system, buildings and homes, as well as the way we manage our industrial and municipal waste, including the way we protect our forest and oceans as the carbon sinks.
The Cuvette Centrale peatlands in the central Congo basin is believed to be the world's largest peatland system, and the region's most important carbon sink. Carbon sinks are forests, oceans, or other natural locations that have the ability to absorb carbon from the atmosphere.
For this reason, large forested areas of the Earth, such as the Amazon basin, are important "carbon sinks".
Absorption is achieved through so-called "carbon sinks," which are natural or artificial reservoirs such as forests or oceans.
What about 'wood miles', and aren't we constantly being told that forests are important 'carbon sinks'?
"For more than half a century, people have been trying to understand why carbon sinks more here and less there.
If this process occurs elsewhere, desert aquifers may rank among the top three largest active carbon sinks on land, Li says.