carbon copy

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carbon copy

n. Abbr. cc
1.
a. A copy of a document made by using carbon paper.
b. A copy of a document made by using a photocopier or similar mechanism.
c. A copy of an electronic document sent to people in addition to the addressed recipient.
2. A person or thing that closely resembles another.
tr.v. carbon cop·ied, carbon cop·y·ing, carbon cop·ies
1.
a. To reproduce (a document) as a carbon copy.
b. To send (an electronic document) as a carbon copy.
2. To designate (someone) as the recipient of a carbon copy: I carbon copied my lawyer on all of the correspondence regarding the contract.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

carbon copy

n
1. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a duplicate copy of writing, typewriting, or drawing obtained by using carbon paper. Often shortened to: carbon
2. informal a person or thing that is identical or very similar to another
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

car′bon cop′y


n.
1. a duplicate, as of something typewritten, made with carbon paper.
2. any near or exact duplicate; replica.
[1890–95]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carbon copy - a copy made with carbon paper
copy - a thing made to be similar or identical to another thing; "she made a copy of the designer dress"; "the clone was a copy of its ancestor"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

carbon copy

noun
Something closely resembling another:
Archaic: simulacre.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
نُسْخَه، وَرَقَةُ كَرْبون
průklepkopie
gennemslagkopi
hiilikopio
indigómásolat
afrit
prieklep
karbon kopyası

carbon copy

n (Typing) → copia (in carta carbone) (fig) → copia f carbone inv
he's a carbon copy of his father → è tutto suo padre, è la copia carbone di suo padre
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

carbon

(ˈkaːbən)
an element occurring as diamond and graphite and also in coal etc.
carbon copy
a copy of writing or typing made by means of carbon paper.
carbon dioxide (daiˈoksaid)
a gas present in the air, breathed out by man and other animals.
carbon monoxide (məˈnoksaid)
a colourless, very poisonous gas which has no smell. Carbon monoxide is given off by car engines.
carbon paper
a type of paper coated with carbon etc which makes a copy when placed between the sheets being written or typed.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
He added the incident was almost a carbon-copy of another in which another garda lost his life when his patrol car was struck by a stolen vehicle in December 2009.
Hussein Hakem made Qadsia mission even harder when he scored the last goal at the 57th minute from a carbon-copy of Salem's shot in the first halftime.
AFTER 15 years' jail in Germany for murdering his girlfriend by strangling her and dumping her body in a shallow woodland grave, calculating Marc Chivers returned to Britain and carried out a carbon-copy killing in Essex in 2008.
And the second goal four minutes after the break was almost a carbon-copy as Sean Doherty ran onto a cross by John Newby, who was in the Liverpool side which won the FA Youth Cup 15 years ago, and rose above the defenders to head the ball home.
IT SEEMS to me that the EU is beginning to look like a carbon-copy of the old Soviet Union, where the top leaders are simply appointing themselves, putting toothless non-entities as front-men whilst consolidating the powerbase of those really in charge.