carbonic acid


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Related to carbonic acid: carbolic acid

car·bon·ic acid

 (kär-bŏn′ĭk)
n.
A weak, unstable acid, H2CO3, present in solutions of carbon dioxide in water.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

carbonic acid

n
(Elements & Compounds) a weak acid formed when carbon dioxide combines with water: obtained only in aqueous solutions, never in the pure state. Formula: H2CO3
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

carbon′ic ac′id


n.
the acid, H2CO3, formed when carbon dioxide dissolves in water, found as its salts and esters, the carbonates.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carbonic acid - a weak acid known only in solution; formed when carbon dioxide combines with water
acid - any of various water-soluble compounds having a sour taste and capable of turning litmus red and reacting with a base to form a salt
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
ácido carbónico
hiilihappo
acide carbonique
kolsýra
kwas węglowy
kolsyra

carbonic acid

[kɑːˌbɒnɪkˈæsɪd] Nácido m carbónico
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
Indeed, each man consumes, in one hour, the oxygen contained in more than 176 pints of air, and this air, charged (as then) with a nearly equal quantity of carbonic acid, becomes unbreathable.
Would he obtain air by chemical means, in getting by heat the oxygen contained in chlorate of potash, and in absorbing carbonic acid by caustic potash?
But it was not enough to renew the oxygen; they must absorb the carbonic acid produced by expiration.
Bubbles of carbonic acid gas will rise to the surface and burst, and make rings two or three feet wide.
But good society, floated on gossamer wings of light irony, is of very expensive production; requiring nothing less than a wide and arduous national life condensed in unfragrant deafening factories, cramping itself in mines, sweating at furnaces, grinding, hammering, weaving under more or less oppression of carbonic acid, or else, spread over sheepwalks, and scattered in lonely houses and huts on the clayey or chalky corn-lands, where the rainy days look dreary.
Water absorbs carbon dioxide and turns it into carbonic acid that reacts with the rocks on the ground during erosion.
Just like carbonic acid, carbonate ions can react with dissolved metal cations (such as Mg2+, Ca2+, and Fe2+) to bind carbon permanently into mineral form.
When C[O.sub.2] is absorbed by seawater, it sets off a series of chemical reactions: carbonic acid ([H.sub.2]C[O.sub.3]) is formed, which then dissociates to [H.sub.3][O.sup.+] and bicarbonate (HC[O.sub.3]).
However, if the leakage contains carbonic acid, weathering could actually trap more carbon from the atmosphere, lessening the effects of melting permafrost on global warming.
The pH of carbonated water is around 3 or 4, because the infusion of carbon dioxide into the water results in the formation of carbonic acid. Many other foods that are bottled or canned today have a pH below 4, because of additives such as acetic acid, ascorbic acid, citric acid, and other acids.
When rainwater dissolves carbon dioxide from the atmosphere or soil, it produces a dilute carbonic acid that dissolves the limestone as it runs over it, thus forming the cave.