carcass

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car·cass

 (kär′kəs)
n.
1. The dead body of an animal, especially one slaughtered for food.
2. The body of a human.
3. Remains from which the substance or character is gone: the carcass of a former empire.
4. A framework or basic structure: the carcass of a burned-out house.

[Middle English carcas, from Anglo-Norman carcais and Medieval Latin carcasium.]

carcass

(ˈkɑːkəs) or

carcase

n
1. the dead body of an animal, esp one that has been slaughtered for food, with the head, limbs, and entrails removed
2. informal usually facetious or derogatory a person's body
3. the skeleton or framework of a structure
4. the remains of anything when its life or vitality is gone; shell
[C14: from Old French carcasse, of obscure origin]

car•cass

(ˈkɑr kəs)

n.
1. the dead body of an animal, esp. of a slaughtered animal after removal of the offal.
2. Slang. the body of a human being, whether living or dead.
3. the physical or structural remnant of something stripped, plundered, or decayed; shell.
4. an unfinished skeleton or framework, as of a house or ship.
[1250–1300; < Anglo-French; Middle French carcasse < Italian carcassa]
syn: See body.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carcass - the dead body of an animal especially one slaughtered and dressed for foodcarcass - the dead body of an animal especially one slaughtered and dressed for food
dead body, body - a natural object consisting of a dead animal or person; "they found the body in the lake"

carcass

noun
1. body, remains, corpse, skeleton, dead body, cadaver (Medical) A cluster of vultures crouched on the carcass of a dead buffalo.
2. remains, shell, framework, debris, remnants, hulk At one end of the camp lies the carcass of an aircraft which crashed in the mountains.
3. (Informal) body, butt (U.S. slang), ass (U.S. slang), arse (taboo slang) Get your carcass back to the boathouse right now!

carcass

noun
The physical frame of a dead person or animal:
Slang: stiff.
Translations
جيفَـه
poražené zvíře
ådselkadaver
tetem
skerdena
kautķermenis
zabité zviera
lešinatruplo
as

carcass

carcase [ˈkɑːkəs] N
1. [of animal] → res f muerta; (= body) → cuerpo m; (= dead body) → cadáver m
to save one's carcasssalvar el pellejo
2. [of building, vehicle] → carcasa f, armazón m or f

carcass

[ˈkɑːrkəs] n [animal] → carcasse fcar chase ncourse-poursuite f

carcass

n
(= corpse)Leiche f; (of animal)Kadaver m, → (Tier)leiche f; (at butcher’s) → Rumpf m; move your fat carcass! (inf)schwing deinen Arsch weg! (sl)
(of ship, house)Skelett nt; (= remains)Überbleibsel pl, → Trümmer pl

carcass

carcase [ˈkɑːkəs] n (of animal) → carcassa

carcass

(ˈkaːkəs) noun
a dead body, usually animal, not human. The carcasses of various animals hung in the butcher's shop.
References in periodicals archive ?
Demonstrations will include cheese making with sheep milk by Andy Swincote; sheep dog handling by James Dewhirst; crook-making/ dressing by Dennis Wall; lamb carcass dressing by the Beltex Sheep Society; and dry-stone walling by Peter Halliday.
Increased carcass dressing percentage explained 66% (65 g/d) of the increase (98 g/d) in carcass adjusted ADG in ZH supplemented lambs.
Among carcass characteristics the carcass dressing % (52.99 +- 0.77 vs 49.41 +- 0.6) and leg weight (kg) (1.28 +- 0.06 vs 1.05 +- 0.04) increased (P < 0.05) in B compared to A.
Hot carcass dressing ([hot carcass weight/empty BW] * 100), cold carcass dressing ([cold carcass weight/empty BW] * 100), and cooling loss (hot carcass weight--cold carcass weight/ hot carcass weight) were calculated.
Similar results were reported in four genetic groups finished in feedlot, where hot carcass dressing was higher (p(less then)0.05) than Canchin (55.2%) genetic group in comparison with the Caracu (50.4%) Aberdeen Angus x Canchin (53.8%) and Charolais x Caracu (52.4%) (Ito et al., 2012).
Hot carcass dressing (HCD): The percentage of individual animal hot carcass dressing was defined as the ratio of hot carcass weight divided by live weight 14h before slaughter of animals.
There are no great differences for carcass characteristics between these two categories when slaughtered at similar weight; however, carcass dressing for younger bulls is greater (COSTA et al., 2002).
'In addition to this they discovered partial neck muscle removal, which is outside specification, and that fat was also taken from the thoracic cavity despite not being allowed under the current carcass dressing rules.'
Kids fed the SFC showed a similar cold carcass dressing percentage in comparison with the control group.