carcass

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car·cass

 (kär′kəs)
n.
1. The dead body of an animal, especially one slaughtered for food.
2. The body of a human.
3. Remains from which the substance or character is gone: the carcass of a former empire.
4. A framework or basic structure: the carcass of a burned-out house.

[Middle English carcas, from Anglo-Norman carcais and Medieval Latin carcasium.]

carcass

(ˈkɑːkəs) or

carcase

n
1. the dead body of an animal, esp one that has been slaughtered for food, with the head, limbs, and entrails removed
2. informal usually facetious or derogatory a person's body
3. the skeleton or framework of a structure
4. the remains of anything when its life or vitality is gone; shell
[C14: from Old French carcasse, of obscure origin]

car•cass

(ˈkɑr kəs)

n.
1. the dead body of an animal, esp. of a slaughtered animal after removal of the offal.
2. Slang. the body of a human being, whether living or dead.
3. the physical or structural remnant of something stripped, plundered, or decayed; shell.
4. an unfinished skeleton or framework, as of a house or ship.
[1250–1300; < Anglo-French; Middle French carcasse < Italian carcassa]
syn: See body.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carcass - the dead body of an animal especially one slaughtered and dressed for foodcarcass - the dead body of an animal especially one slaughtered and dressed for food
dead body, body - a natural object consisting of a dead animal or person; "they found the body in the lake"

carcass

noun
1. body, remains, corpse, skeleton, dead body, cadaver (Medical) A cluster of vultures crouched on the carcass of a dead buffalo.
2. remains, shell, framework, debris, remnants, hulk At one end of the camp lies the carcass of an aircraft which crashed in the mountains.
3. (Informal) body, butt (U.S. slang), ass (U.S. slang), arse (taboo slang) Get your carcass back to the boathouse right now!

carcass

noun
The physical frame of a dead person or animal:
Slang: stiff.
Translations
جيفَـه
poražené zvíře
ådselkadaver
tetem
skerdena
kautķermenis
zabité zviera
lešinatruplo
as

carcass

carcase [ˈkɑːkəs] N
1. [of animal] → res f muerta; (= body) → cuerpo m; (= dead body) → cadáver m
to save one's carcasssalvar el pellejo
2. [of building, vehicle] → carcasa f, armazón m or f

carcass

[ˈkɑːrkəs] n [animal] → carcasse fcar chase ncourse-poursuite f

carcass

n
(= corpse)Leiche f; (of animal)Kadaver m, → (Tier)leiche f; (at butcher’s) → Rumpf m; move your fat carcass! (inf)schwing deinen Arsch weg! (sl)
(of ship, house)Skelett nt; (= remains)Überbleibsel pl, → Trümmer pl

carcass

carcase [ˈkɑːkəs] n (of animal) → carcassa

carcass

(ˈkaːkəs) noun
a dead body, usually animal, not human. The carcasses of various animals hung in the butcher's shop.
References in classic literature ?
If you were a sociable person, he was quite willing to enter into conversation with you, and to explain to you the deadly nature of the ptomaines which are found in tubercular pork; and while he was talking with you you could hardly be so ungrateful as to notice that a dozen carcasses were passing him untouched.
In still other places men were engaged in cutting up the carcasses that had been through the chilling rooms.
Unlike the place they had left, all this work was done on one floor; and instead of there being one line of carcasses which moved to the workmen, there were fifteen or twenty lines, and the men moved from one to another of these.
Then once more the gates were opened, and another lot rushed in; and so out of each pen there rolled a steady stream of carcasses, which the men upon the killing beds had to get out of the way.
It was all highly specialized labor, each man having his task to do; generally this would consist of only two or three specific cuts, and he would pass down the line of fifteen or twenty carcasses, making these cuts upon each.
Tarzan then descended from the tree, dispatched those that were not already dead and proceeded to skin the carcasses.
Leisurely he gathered up the six pelts and one of the carcasses, and as the lioness appeared between the boles of two trees he swung upward into the branches above him.
The ape-man doubted the verity of the latter suggestion as he had fed the lion the entire carcasses of a deer and a hyena only a few days since--he could not have starved in so short a time, while the little rivulet running across the gulch furnished him with water a-plenty.
The perfect preservation of the carcasses of the Siberian elephants and rhinoceroses is certainly one of the most wonderful facts in geology; but independently of the imagined difficulty of supplying them with food from the adjoining countries, the whole case is not, I think, so perplexing as it has generally been considered.
There were the deserted fires still smoking, surrounded by the carcasses of buffaloes just killed.
had granted the favor of being buried in Saint Laurent, in better company, they found among all those hideous carcasses two skeletons, one of which held the other in its embrace.
White sharks feeding on whale carcasses appear to feed until satiated (McCosker, 1985).