carcinogenic


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car·cin·o·gen

 (kär-sĭn′ə-jən, kär′sə-nə-jĕn′)
n.
A cancer-causing substance or agent.

car′ci·no·gen′e·sis (kär′sə-nə-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs) n.
car′cin·o·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.
car′ci·no·ge·nic′i·ty (-jə-nĭs′ĭ-tē) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.carcinogenic - causing or tending to cause cancer; "the carcinogenic action of certain chemicals"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
karcinogénrákkeltőrákokozó

carcinogenic

[ˌkɑːsɪnəˈdʒenɪk] ADJcancerígeno, carcinógeno
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

carcinogenic

[ˌkɑːrsɪnəˈdʒɛnɪk] adj [substance] → cancérigènecar crash naccident m de voiture
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

carcinogenic

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

carcinogenic

[ˌkɑːsɪnəˈdʒɛnɪk] adj (Med) → cancerogeno/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

car·ci·no·gen·ic

n. carcinógeno-a, de origen canceroso.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

carcinogenic

adj cancerígeno, que causa cáncer
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Department of Health in Abu Dhabi recalled two brands of blood pressure medicine that contained carcinogenic properties.
Summary: The medicine may contain carcinogenic substances.
The WHO lists processed meat as carcinogenic, primarily because of evidence linking it to a raised risk of bowel cancer, while it says red meat is 'probably carcinogenic'.
THURSDAY, July 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Talcum powder, made from talc, which contains asbestos is considered carcinogenic to humans, while the carcinogenicity of talc without asbestos is unclear, according to the American Cancer Society.
Also, people living within the vicinity where e-waste materials are burnt in the open may be at risk of developing cancer due to carcinogenic substances released into the atmosphere.
The World Health Organisation concluded in 2015 that processed meat is carcinogenic.
In 1991, the IARC assessed the carcinogenicity of coffee, classifying it as 'possibly carcinogenic to humans' based on limited evidence from case-control studies and data from experimental animals.
The IARC had previously classified coffee as "possibly" carcinogenic (category 2B) in 1991.
The latest report from the International Agency for Research on Cancer, the cancer agency of the World Health Organisation, that drinking very hot beverages is "probably carcinogenic to humans", is interesting as well as alarming.
There is no conclusive evidence that drinking coffee causes cancer, the World Health Organization's cancer agency will say in a reverse of its previous warning, but it will also say all "very hot" drinks are probably carcinogenic.
This is in contrast to another WHO committee report in 2015 stating that glyphosate was probably carcinogenic.