carcinoid


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Related to carcinoid: carcinoid syndrome, Carcinoid tumor

car·ci·noid

 (kär′sə-noid′)
n.
A small, slow-growing, benign or malignant tumor, found usually in the gastrointestinal tract, that is composed of islands of rounded cells and secretes serotonin.

carcinoid

(ˈkɑːsɪˌnɔɪd)
n
a small serotonin-secreting tumour, usually slow-growing and occurring in the gastrointestinal tract, although it may spread to the liver

car•ci•noid

(ˈkɑr səˌnɔɪd)

n.
a small, yellowish amino-acid- and peptide-secreting tumor usu. found in the gastrointestinal tract and the lung.
[1925–30; carcin (oma) + -oid]

carcinoid

a small, yellow tumor that may develop from argentaffin cells in the gastrointestinal mucosa and spread widely throughout the body.
See also: Cancer
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carcinoid - a small tumor (benign or malignant) arising from the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract; usually associated with excessive secretion of serotonin
neoplasm, tumor, tumour - an abnormal new mass of tissue that serves no purpose
Translations

carcinoid

adj & n carcinoide m; — tumor tumor m carcinoide
References in periodicals archive ?
The 51-year-old journalist, who has led the corporation's Westminster coverage since 2005, needs an operation to remove a bronchial carcinoid tumour from his lung.
The 51-year-old journalist, who has led the BBC's Westminster coverage since 2005, needs surgery for a carcinoid tumour.
The veteran broadcaster is to undergo an operation to remove a rare carcinoid tumour.
The political editor, who has led the corporation's Westminster coverage since 2005, is being treated for a carcinoid tumour on his lung, which will involve surgery.
Out of the total 1498 cases Squamous cell carcinoma was found to be the most prevailing with 388 cases (26.08%) followed by Small cell carcinoma (19.08%) Adenocarcinoma (18.48%) Non- small cell carcinoma (16.73%) Carcinoid carcinoma (11.56%) undifferentiated carcinoma (4.23%) and large cell carcinoma (3.83%) as shown in Figure.1.
When Barbara Chapman died in St Kentigern Hospice, St Asaph, in 2011, pathologist Dr Mark Atkinson gave the cause of death as carcinoid tumour exactly the same type of cancer he had identified when she had her appendix removed in 2001.
[8] Carcinoids may occasionally present with symptoms of carcinoid syndrome (flushing, tachycardia, and diarrhea).
A carcinoid tumour of the testis can be divided into 3 groups: primary carcinoid tumour, metastasis from a different location, and carcinoid tumour arising in a testicular teratoma.[sup.1] Cope was the first to report a testicular carcinoid tumour, a mestastasis from an ileal carcinoid tumour[sup.2] and Simon and colleagues reported the first primary testicular carcinoid tumour in 1954.[sup.3] Although more than 60 cases have been reported to date, testicular carcinoid tumour still remains a very rare disease; moreover, a primary testicular carcinoid tumour with mature teratoma metastatic to the retroperitoneal lymph nodes is extremely rare.[sup.4] Because there was no effective treatment for the metastatic lesions, the prognosis for these cases have been disappointing.[sup.1]
Typical Carcinoid (TC) comprise 1-2% and Atypical Carcinoid (AC) comprise 0.1-0.2% of all pulmonary tumors, whereas small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) and Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma (LCNECs) make up 20% and 1.6-3%, respectively
Discovered using Lexicon's unique approach to gene science, XERMELO (telotristat ethyl) is the first and only approved oral therapy for carcinoid syndrome diarrhea in combination with somatostatin analog (SSA) therapy in adults inadequately controlled by SSAs.
It helps distinguish whether the etiology is central or peripheral.10 Past studies reveal that Inferior petrosal sinus sampling has a sensitivity of 96 - 100% in determining the case of elevated ACTH.11 Here we present a case of a 67 years old female with Cushing syndrome secondary to carcinoid tumour of the lung in which BIPSS helped determine the cause of elevated serum cortisol levels.
The indications remain the same as those for the previous pre-filled syringe and include the treatment of adult patients with unresectable, well- or moderately-differentiated, locally advanced or metastatic gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors to improve progression-free survival; treatment of adults with carcinoid syndrome; when used, it reduces the frequency of short-acting somatostatin analog rescue therapy; and the long-term treatment of patients with acromegaly who have had an inadequate response to surgery and/or radiotherapy, or for whom surgery and/or radiotherapy is not an option.