cardiac

(redirected from cardiac afterload)
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car·di·ac

 (kär′dē-ăk′)
adj.
1. Of, near, or relating to the heart: cardiac arteries. See Usage Note at coronary.
2. Of or relating to the cardia.
n.
A person with a heart disorder.

[Middle English, from Latin cardiacus, from Greek kardiakos, from kardiā, heart; see kerd- in Indo-European roots.]

cardiac

(ˈkɑːdɪˌæk)
adj
1. (Anatomy) of or relating to the heart
2. (Anatomy) of or relating to the portion of the stomach connected to the oesophagus
n
3. (Medicine) a person with a heart disorder
4. (Pharmacology) obsolete a drug that stimulates the heart muscle
[C17: from Latin cardiacus, from Greek, from kardia heart]

car•di•ac

(ˈkɑr diˌæk)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to the heart: cardiac disease.
2. of or pertaining to the esophageal portion of the stomach.
n.
3. a person suffering from heart disease.
[1400–50; late Middle English (< Middle French cardiaque) < Latin cardiacus < Greek kardiakós <kardí(a) heart]

car·di·ac

(kär′dē-ăk′)
Relating to the heart: a cardiac disorder.

cardiac

Relating to the heart.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.cardiac - of or relating to the heart; "cardiac arrest"
Translations
قَلْبي، مُتَعَلِّقٌ بالقَلب
srdeční
hjerte-
قلبی
szív-
hjarta-
širdies
sirds-
kalbe ait

cardiac

[ˈkɑːdɪæk]
A. ADJcardíaco
B. CPD cardiac arrest Nparo m cardíaco

cardiac

[ˈkɑːrdiæk] adjcardiaquecardiac arrest narrêt m cardiaque

cardiac

adjHerz-

cardiac

[ˈkɑːdɪæk] adj (Med) → cardiaco/a

cardiac

(ˈkaːdiӕk) adjective
of the heart. This patient has a cardiac complaint; cardiac failure.

car·di·ac

a. cardíaco-a, referente al corazón.

cardiac

adj cardíaco or cardiaco
References in periodicals archive ?
Alterations mainly in cardiac afterload and contractility intravascular volume status or heart rate may significantly impact on the ductus venosus flow velocity waveform.
High ABIs indicate arteriosclerotic vessel wall stiffness, which has the hemodynamic consequences of reduced coronary Idling, increased cardiac afterload, and possible microvascular damage to the brain induced by high pressures.
Pharmacologic treatment for symptoms of chronic heart failure involves vasodilation, with the goal of increasing peripheral perfusion and reducing cardiac afterload, but vasodilation can be directly induced nonpharmacologically with warm thermal therapies, Dr.