cardiac

(redirected from cardiac compression)
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car·di·ac

 (kär′dē-ăk′)
adj.
1. Of, near, or relating to the heart: cardiac arteries. See Usage Note at coronary.
2. Of or relating to the cardia.
n.
A person with a heart disorder.

[Middle English, from Latin cardiacus, from Greek kardiakos, from kardiā, heart; see kerd- in Indo-European roots.]

cardiac

(ˈkɑːdɪˌæk)
adj
1. (Anatomy) of or relating to the heart
2. (Anatomy) of or relating to the portion of the stomach connected to the oesophagus
n
3. (Medicine) a person with a heart disorder
4. (Pharmacology) obsolete a drug that stimulates the heart muscle
[C17: from Latin cardiacus, from Greek, from kardia heart]

car•di•ac

(ˈkɑr diˌæk)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to the heart: cardiac disease.
2. of or pertaining to the esophageal portion of the stomach.
n.
3. a person suffering from heart disease.
[1400–50; late Middle English (< Middle French cardiaque) < Latin cardiacus < Greek kardiakós <kardí(a) heart]

car·di·ac

(kär′dē-ăk′)
Relating to the heart: a cardiac disorder.

cardiac

Relating to the heart.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.cardiac - of or relating to the heart; "cardiac arrest"
Translations
قَلْبي، مُتَعَلِّقٌ بالقَلب
srdeční
hjerte-
قلبی
szív-
hjarta-
širdies
sirds-
kalbe ait

cardiac

[ˈkɑːdɪæk]
A. ADJcardíaco
B. CPD cardiac arrest Nparo m cardíaco

cardiac

[ˈkɑːrdiæk] adjcardiaquecardiac arrest narrêt m cardiaque

cardiac

adjHerz-

cardiac

[ˈkɑːdɪæk] adj (Med) → cardiaco/a

cardiac

(ˈkaːdiӕk) adjective
of the heart. This patient has a cardiac complaint; cardiac failure.

car·di·ac

a. cardíaco-a, referente al corazón.

cardiac

adj cardíaco or cardiaco
References in periodicals archive ?
Buy cardiac compression equipment to Region SkENne.
twitter When he looked round, he said he was shocked to find he had knocked the dog out and tried to save it by giving mouthto-mouth resuscitation and cardiac compression without success.
4] noted that the prevalence of cardiac compression with tamponade in RA varied from 0.
In her first column, Halm discusses chest tube manipulation, offering an overview of the evidence dealing with whether milking or stripping chest tubes increases patency and prevents cardiac compression in postoperative cardiac surgery patients.
When VT developed, the surgeons commenced tightening the sublaminar wires as quickly as possible in case cardiac compression became necessary.
Preoperative echo/EKG with exercise revealed cardiac compression in 117 (95%).
That is, the performance of external cardiac compression with the following characteristics: continuous, uninterrupted, push hard, push fast, complete chest recoil, and equal time for compression and release.