cardiac glycoside


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Related to cardiac glycoside: digitalis, digoxin

cardiac glycoside

n.
Any of several glycosides obtained chiefly from plant sources such as the foxglove, used medicinally to increase the force of contraction of heart muscle and to regulate heartbeats.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cardiac glycoside - obtained from a number of plants and used to stimulate the heart in cases of heart failure
steroid - any of several fat-soluble organic compounds having as a basis 17 carbon atoms in four rings; many have important physiological effects
digitalin, digitalis, digitalis glycoside - a powerful cardiac stimulant obtained from foxglove
References in periodicals archive ?
Potassium chloride may also be used cautiously to abolish arrhythmias or cardiac glycoside toxicity precipitated by a loss of potassium.
Acute yellow oleander (Thevetia peruviana) poisoning: cardiac arrhythmias, electrolyte disturbances, and serum cardiac glycoside concentrations on presentation to hospital.
Digoxin is a cardiac glycoside used as an inotrope in heart failure [1].
Cardiac glycosides are found in a diverse group of plants including Digitalis purpurea and Digitalis lanata (Foxgloves), Nerium oleander (Common oleander), Thevetia peruviana (yellow oleander), Convallaria majalis (Lily of the valley), Urginea maritime and Urginea indica (Squill), Strophanthus gratus (ouabain), Apocynum cannabinum (Dogbane), and Cheiranthus cheiri (Wallflower) has resulted in cardiac glycoside poisoning.
Digoxin is a purified cardiac glycoside similar to digitoxin extracted from fox glove plant, Digitalis lanata.
(2) Conventional therapy for congestive heart failure includes diuretics and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, which are combined on occasion with a cardiac glycoside. Digoxin is the most commonly prescribed cardiac glycoside.
Nishio et al., "Modulation of cytokine production and protection against lethal endotoxemia by the cardiac glycoside ouabain," Circulation, vol.
One's a cardiac glycoside used in heart failure while the other's a period of artistic style from 17th century Rome.
Cardiac glycoside toxicity: More than 200 years and counting.
Although these patients recovered from cardiac glycoside poisonings following antidotal and supportive therapies, approximately 2,000 deaths occur each year in Sri Lanka following intentional self-poisoning with yellow oleander (Thevetia peruviana) seeds, which contain two highly cardiotoxic thevetin glycosides.
Also Cardiac glycoside was found to have a acaricidal effect against larva and adult stages of the camel tick (21).