caregiver


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Related to caregiver: caretaker

caregiver

a person who cares for the sick or disabled: She is the old man’s caregiver.
Not to be confused with:
caretaker – a person in charge of maintenance or in charge of an estate: He is the caretaker of the mansion and the grounds.

care·giv·er

 (kâr′gĭv′ər)
n.
1. An individual, such as a physician, nurse, or social worker, who assists in the identification, prevention, or treatment of an illness or disability.
2. An individual, such as a family member or guardian, who takes care of a child or dependent adult.

care′giv′ing adj. & n.

caregiver

(ˈkɛəˌɡɪvə)
n
(Social Welfare) US and Canadian a person who has accepted responsibility for looking after a vulnerable neighbour or relative. Also called: carer

care•giv•er

(ˈkɛərˌgɪv ər)

n.
1. a person who cares for someone who is sick or disabled.
2. an adult who cares for a child.
[1970–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.caregiver - a person who helps in identifying or preventing or treating illness or disabilitycaregiver - a person who helps in identifying or preventing or treating illness or disability
health profession - the body of individuals whose work helps to maintain the health of their clients
bonesetter - someone (not necessarily a licensed physician) who sets broken bones
electrologist - someone skilled in the use of electricity to remove moles or warts or hair roots
medical assistant - a person trained to assist medical professionals
medical man, medical practitioner - someone who practices medicine
nurse - one skilled in caring for young children or the sick (usually under the supervision of a physician)
druggist, pharmacist, pill pusher, pill roller, apothecary, chemist - a health professional trained in the art of preparing and dispensing drugs
professional, professional person - a person engaged in one of the learned professions
2.caregiver - a person who is responsible for attending to the needs of a child or dependent adult
adult, grownup - a fully developed person from maturity onward
Translations
المعتني المُعْتَني بالمَرْضى بالعاجِزين
-kaošetřovatelpečovatel
hjælperplejer
skrbnik

care·giv·er

n. asistente de salud, facilitador de atención sanitaria.

caregiver

n cuidador -ra mf, persona que cuida a un enfermo o discapacitado
References in periodicals archive ?
By utilizing the VA's Caregiver Support Line at 855-260-3274, you can talk to a caring licensed professional.
Regardless of your circumstances, Barbara Moscowitz, MSW, LICSW, with Massachusetts General Hospital's Division of Palliative Care and Geriatic Medicine, says caregiver education should be a priority early on and that support for the task of caregiving is helpful throughout your life.
Moreover, significant associations have been found between relationship with the CR and a number of variables of caregiver's situation as presented in table-I.
INTERNATIONALLY-QUALIFIED nurses (IQNs) working as caregivers have long been a feature of New Zealand's residential aged-care workforce.
Rachel Childs, 29, hired a caregiver online to look after her twin, who she claimed had autism.
"A caregiver is an unpaid or paid member of a person's social network who helps them with activities of daily living.
Across the country, there is an average of 34.5 million informal caregivers caring for people 50 years and older, according to Caolina Hoyos, the director of the Caregiver Resource Center at New York City's Department for the Aging.
Early this morning, a foreign caregiver surnamed Lu uploaded two videos to the Facebook Group Breaking News Commune showing a Hakka-speaking Taiwanese caregiver shouting at and striking an elderly woman in a wheelchair.
I'm looking forward to terrific days of education, support and sharing with area caregivers," said Gary Barg, Founder and Editor-In-Chief of Today's Caregiver magazine and Caregiver.com, author of the books, The Fearless Caregiver and The Caregiving Ties that Bind and Host of over 200 Fearless Caregiver Conference held in 28 states.
According to the report, causes of caregiver burnout include confusion at being thrust into the role of caregiver; unrealistic expectations relating to the potential positive effect of caregivers; lack of control due to lack of money, resources, and/or skills; and unreasonable demands, often placed by caregivers themselves.
"In Canada, the government itself recognizes the important role of caregivers to the growth of the Canadian economy, yet, it has not made significant and bold changes to the caregiver program to address long-term issues surrounding the program and the caregiving needs of Canadians," said Palmaria.

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