caricature

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caricature

a picture that exaggerates a person’s features to produce a comic or grotesque effect: Political cartoonists often use caricature to illustrate the character of their subject.
Not to be confused with:
character – distinctive feature or attribute; nature; disposition; makeup: It is against her character to be anything other than kind.
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

car·i·ca·ture

 (kăr′ĭ-kə-cho͝or′, -chər)
n.
1.
a. A representation, especially pictorial or literary, in which the subject's distinctive features or peculiarities are deliberately exaggerated to produce a comic or grotesque effect.
b. The art of creating such representations.
2. A grotesque imitation or misrepresentation: The trial was a caricature of justice.
tr.v. car·i·ca·tured, car·i·ca·tur·ing, car·i·ca·tures
To represent or imitate in an exaggerated, distorted manner.

[French, from Italian caricatura, from caricare, to load, exaggerate, from Late Latin carricāre, from Latin carrus, a Gallic type of wagon; see kers- in Indo-European roots.]

car′i·ca·tur′ist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

caricature

(ˈkærɪkəˌtjʊə)
n
1. a pictorial, written, or acted representation of a person, which exaggerates his or her characteristic traits for comic effect
2. a ludicrously inadequate or inaccurate imitation: he is a caricature of a statesman.
vb
(tr) to represent in caricature or produce a caricature of
[C18: from Italian caricatura a distortion, exaggeration, from caricare to load, exaggerate; see cargo]
ˈcaricaˌtural adj
ˈcaricaˌturist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

car•i•ca•ture

(ˈkær ɪ kə tʃər, -ˌtʃʊər)

n., v. -tured, -tur•ing. n.
1. a picture or description ludicrously exaggerating the peculiarities or defects of a person or thing.
2. the art or process of producing such pictures or descriptions.
3. any imitation so distorted or inferior as to be ludicrous.
v.t.
4. to make a caricature of.
[1740–50; < Italian caricatura, derivative of caricat(o) affected, literally, loaded]
car′i•ca•tur•ist, n.
syn: See burlesque.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

caricature

a distorted representation, usually pictorial, often used to parody people in public life. — caricaturist, n.
See also: Representation
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

caricature


Past participle: caricatured
Gerund: caricaturing

Imperative
caricature
caricature
Present
I caricature
you caricature
he/she/it caricatures
we caricature
you caricature
they caricature
Preterite
I caricatured
you caricatured
he/she/it caricatured
we caricatured
you caricatured
they caricatured
Present Continuous
I am caricaturing
you are caricaturing
he/she/it is caricaturing
we are caricaturing
you are caricaturing
they are caricaturing
Present Perfect
I have caricatured
you have caricatured
he/she/it has caricatured
we have caricatured
you have caricatured
they have caricatured
Past Continuous
I was caricaturing
you were caricaturing
he/she/it was caricaturing
we were caricaturing
you were caricaturing
they were caricaturing
Past Perfect
I had caricatured
you had caricatured
he/she/it had caricatured
we had caricatured
you had caricatured
they had caricatured
Future
I will caricature
you will caricature
he/she/it will caricature
we will caricature
you will caricature
they will caricature
Future Perfect
I will have caricatured
you will have caricatured
he/she/it will have caricatured
we will have caricatured
you will have caricatured
they will have caricatured
Future Continuous
I will be caricaturing
you will be caricaturing
he/she/it will be caricaturing
we will be caricaturing
you will be caricaturing
they will be caricaturing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been caricaturing
you have been caricaturing
he/she/it has been caricaturing
we have been caricaturing
you have been caricaturing
they have been caricaturing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been caricaturing
you will have been caricaturing
he/she/it will have been caricaturing
we will have been caricaturing
you will have been caricaturing
they will have been caricaturing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been caricaturing
you had been caricaturing
he/she/it had been caricaturing
we had been caricaturing
you had been caricaturing
they had been caricaturing
Conditional
I would caricature
you would caricature
he/she/it would caricature
we would caricature
you would caricature
they would caricature
Past Conditional
I would have caricatured
you would have caricatured
he/she/it would have caricatured
we would have caricatured
you would have caricatured
they would have caricatured
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011

caricature

A picture ludicrously exaggerating the qualities, defects, or peculiarities of a person or idea.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.caricature - a representation of a person that is exaggerated for comic effectcaricature - a representation of a person that is exaggerated for comic effect
mock-heroic - a satirical imitation of heroic verse
humor, wit, witticism, wittiness, humour - a message whose ingenuity or verbal skill or incongruity has the power to evoke laughter
parody, pasquinade, put-on, sendup, spoof, charade, lampoon, mockery, burlesque, travesty, takeoff - a composition that imitates or misrepresents somebody's style, usually in a humorous way
Verb1.caricature - represent in or produce a caricature of; "The drawing caricatured the President"
mock - imitate with mockery and derision; "The children mocked their handicapped classmate"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

caricature

noun
1. parody, cartoon, distortion, satire, send-up (Brit. informal), travesty, takeoff (informal), lampoon, burlesque, mimicry, farce The poster showed a caricature of Hitler with a devil's horns and tail.
verb
1. parody, take off (informal), mock, distort, ridicule, mimic, send up (Brit. informal), lampoon, burlesque, satirize Her political career has been caricatured in the newspapers.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

caricature

noun
A false, derisive, or impudent imitation of something:
verb
To copy (the manner or expression of another), especially in an exaggerated or mocking way:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
رَسْمٌ هَزَليُّ ساخِرٌ
karikaturakarikovat
karikatur
karikatyyripilakuva
karikatúra
skopmynd
karikatūrakarikatūristas
karikatūra
karykaturakarykaturować

caricature

[ˈkærɪkətjʊəʳ]
A. Ncaricatura f; (in newspaper) → dibujo m cómico
it was a caricature of a ceremony (fig) → fue una parodia de ceremonia
B. VTcaricaturizar
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

caricature

[ˈkærɪkətʃʊər] n
(= drawing) → caricature f
(= exaggeration) [truth] → caricature f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

caricature

nKarikatur f
vtkarikieren
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

caricature

[ˈkærɪkəˌtjʊəʳ]
1. ncaricatura
2. vtfare una caricatura di
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

caricature

(ˈkӕrikətjuə) noun
a drawing or imitation (of someone or something) which is so exaggerated as to appear ridiculous. Caricatures of politicians appear in the newspapers every day.
ˈcaricaturist noun
a person who makes caricatures.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
The movie blends a modern myth with caricatural comedy.
Released from prison ten years later, he returns to retrieve the bag, only to find a shrine to an "unknown Saint" built directly over his loot, and a brand new village constructed all around it.The movie blends a modern myth with caricatural comedy.
A la fois passionnel et passionnant, les menus proposes dont une partie releve d'un registre caricatural ne manquent pas de hardiesse et d'ardeur, cranement evoque par des jeunes talents motives par de l'aventure artistique.
The processes of the farce, the simplistic plot and the characters typified and caricatural, serve to introduce what is characteristic of the comedy register, namely, the reflection on different worldviews--the confrontation of different eras.
They tell us, in caricatural form, what we already know -- or at least suppose we do.
Thus, teachers only took caricatural forms: bungling Mr.
'Gentlemen, do you really believe that taking trips to Paris is, for a painter, something original, or a heroic exploit that confers upon that person the right to pose as a professor or master thinker?' This is how the Tunisian painter and sculptor Zubeir Turki responded in 1967 to a group of artists based in Europe who had mocked the 'national culture' that his movement was trying to recover as 'bastardized, caricatural, "exotic"'.
A defesa que aqui se faz e, primeiramente, a de que o que torna a hipocrisia um problema moral nao seria meramente uma associacao caricatural as praticas de engano, mas a mudanca de avaliacao pressuposta no momento em que essa associacao e feita.
came out in France, one couldn't help but think of this influence, all the while thinking it's sharper, less caricatural.
Finally, I infer, through the work of Valle-Inclan, how caricatural mechanisms can be applied to other artistic fields, such as literature, in search of similar expressive effects.