carmine


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car·mine

 (kär′mĭn, -mīn′)
n.
1. A strong to vivid red.
2. A crimson pigment derived from cochineal.
adj.
Strong to vivid red.

[French carmin, from Medieval Latin carminium, probably blend of Arabic qirmiz, kermes; see kermes, and Latin minium, cinnabar; see minium.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

carmine

(ˈkɑːmaɪn)
n
1. (Colours)
a. a vivid red colour, sometimes with a purplish tinge
b. (as adjective): carmine paint.
2. (Dyeing) a pigment of this colour obtained from cochineal
[C18: from Medieval Latin carmīnus, from Arabic qirmiz kermes]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

car•mine

(ˈkɑr mɪn, -maɪn)

n.
1. a crimson or purplish red color.
2. a crimson pigment obtained from cochineal.
[1705–15; < French carmin (color), carmine (pigment), Old French; compare Medieval Latin carminium]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carmine - a variable color averaging a vivid redcarmine - a variable color averaging a vivid red
red, redness - red color or pigment; the chromatic color resembling the hue of blood
Verb1.carmine - color carmine
redden - make red; "The setting sun reddened the sky"
Adj.1.carmine - of a color at the end of the color spectrum (next to orange); resembling the color of blood or cherries or tomatoes or rubies
chromatic - being or having or characterized by hue
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

carmine

[ˈkɑːmaɪn]
A. ADJcarmín, de carmín
B. Ncarmín m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

carmine

adjkarm(es)inrot
nKarmesin nt, → Karmin nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

carmine

[ˈkɑːmaɪn] adj & ncarminio inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

car·mine

n. carmín, carmesí.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
It was a rustly day, a scarlet and buff, yellow and carmine, bronze and crimson day.
She has a tint as white as this sheet of paper, except just in the middle of each cheek, where it passes into the purest and most transparent, most liquid, carmine. Occasionally this rosy fluid overflows into the rest of her face--by which I mean that she blushes--as softly as the mark of your breath on the window- pane.
The greater number, instead of leaves, shoot forth blades of capricious shapes, comprised within a scale of colours pink, carmine, green, olive, fawn, and brown.
Suffice it that a petrel wheeled somewhere between deepening carmine and paling blue, and it took my thoughts off at an earthy tangent.
Some of them were white and some of a brilliant carmine color.
Senor Don Quixote, have you observed the comeliness of my lady the duchess, that smooth complexion of hers like a burnished polished sword, those two cheeks of milk and carmine, that gay lively step with which she treads or rather seems to spurn the earth, so that one would fancy she went radiating health wherever she passed?
It spread up the sides of the pit by the third or fourth day of our imprisonment, and its cactus-like branches formed a carmine fringe to the edges of our triangular window.
The head was finished already: there was but the background to tint and the drapery to shade off; a touch of carmine, too, to add to the ripe lips--a soft curl here and there to the tresses--a deeper tinge to the shadow of the lash under the azured eyelid.
The color mounted to the queen's face; her fine blue eyes seemed to start out of her head and her carmine lips, compared by all the poets of the day to a pomegranate in flower, were trembling with anger.
Some artists,' said Miss La Creevy, 'keep a red coat, and charge seven-and-sixpence extra for hire and carmine; but I don't do that myself, for I don't consider it legitimate.'
He wore a greatcoat in midsummer, being affected with the trembling delirium, and his face was the color of carmine. He died in the road at the foot of Brister's Hill shortly after I came to the woods, so that I have not remembered him as a neighbor.
Made up with curls, wreaths, wings, white bismuth, and carmine, this hopeful young person soared into so pleasing a Cupid as to constitute the chief delight of the maternal part of the spectators; but in private, where his characteristics were a precocious cutaway coat and an extremely gruff voice, he became of the Turf, turfy.