carnivalesque


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carnivalesque

(ˌkɑːnɪvəˈlɛsk)
adj
characteristic of, suitable for, or like a carnival
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References in classic literature ?
It was based on the deep persuasion that the man at my side was insane with quite another than Carnivalesque lunacy which comes on at one stated time of the year.
Pairing one Allen film with one Chaplin film in each chapter, she discusses the role of the carnivalesque in The Circus and Shadows and Fog; technology and alienation in Modern Times and Sleeper; the master/slave dialectic in The Great Dictator and Zelig; murder in Monsieur Verdoux and Crimes and Misdemeanors; romance in Limelight and Manhattan; and the films' endings.
The carnivalesque tale of the tangled fortunes of two theatrical families is packed with pairs of twins and mistaken identities and was inspired by the Bard's greatest comedies.
The playfully titled 'Ze Papu and Mamu Show'-a nod to the couple's terms of endearment-looked carnivalesque in the publicity material, echoing a variety show in a circus tent.
The carnivalesque atmosphere follows a tense May Day rally in Paris, when hundreds of masked and hooded anarchists torched cars and hurled rocks at police on Tuesday, hijacking a demonstration called by labor unions.
We argue in this article for the potential of the carnivalesque to promote creative engagement with, and opposition to, contemporary systems and ideas.
But any close look at Krampus practices reveals a rather different impulse at work as well: In these carnivalesque traditions, participants are "freed to act out" and to "create tumult wherever they go." Over the centuries, anxious authorities have tried to ban or tightly regulate these anarchic rites.
Locating Robin Hood and the Carnivalesque in the U.S.
Embedded in the hidden line is also Su's notion of a modern renaissance of the carnival, a concept she borrows from Bakhtin's theory of the carnivalesque. She asserts that it was only in the twentieth century that the carnivalesque rose to mainstream comic aesthetics.
In his book on Rabelais, Bakhtin (1965) mentions Shakespeare's name several times, but never focuses on him: Shakespeare only makes his appearances as a background figure within the compass of Bakhtins carnivalesque theory.
Along with the contaminating and unreluctant hypersociability, such manifestations indicate a festive atmosphere of the carnivalesque kind.
What if, on the contrary, in order for us to interact in public with our true face, we have to have a mask hidden somewhere, a mask which renders our unbearable excess, what is in us more than ourselves, a mask which we can put on only exceptionally, in those carnivalesque moments when the standard rules of interaction are suspended?