carob

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car·ob

 (kăr′əb)
n.
1.
a. A Mediterranean evergreen tree (Ceratonia siliqua) of the pea family, having pinnately compound leaves and large, dark, leathery pods.
b. The pod of this plant, containing a sweet edible pulp and seeds that yield a gum used as a stabilizer in food products. Also called algaroba.
2. An edible powder or flour made from the ground seeds and pods of this plant, used as a substitute for chocolate.

[Middle English carabe, from Old French carobe, from Medieval Latin carrūbium, from Arabic ḫarrūba, carob pod; see algaroba.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

carob

(ˈkærəb)
n
1. (Plants) Also called: algarroba an evergreen leguminous Mediterranean tree, Ceratonia siliqua, with compound leaves and edible pods
2. (Cookery) Also called: algarroba or Saint John's bread the long blackish sugary pod of this tree, used as a substitute for chocolate and for animal fodder
[C16: from Old French carobe, from Medieval Latin carrūbium, from Arabic al kharrūbah]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

car•ob

(ˈkær əb)

n.
1. a Mediterranean tree, Ceratonia siliqua, of the legume family, bearing long leathery pods containing sweet edible pulp.
2. the pod of this tree.
3. the pulp of the pods, often ground into a powder and used esp. as a substitute for chocolate.
[1540–50; < Middle French carobe < Medieval Latin carrūbium < Arabic kharrūb bean-pods, carobs]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carob - long pod containing small beans and sweetish edible pulpcarob - long pod containing small beans and sweetish edible pulp; used as animal feed and source of a chocolate substitute
carob powder, Saint-John's-bread, carob - powder from the ground seeds and pods of the carob tree; used as a chocolate substitute
carob bean tree, carob tree, Ceratonia siliqua, algarroba, carob - evergreen Mediterranean tree with edible pods; the biblical carob
bean - any of various seeds or fruits that are beans or resemble beans
2.carob - evergreen Mediterranean tree with edible podscarob - evergreen Mediterranean tree with edible pods; the biblical carob
algarroba, algarroba bean, carob, carob bean, locust bean, locust pod - long pod containing small beans and sweetish edible pulp; used as animal feed and source of a chocolate substitute
bean tree - any of several trees having seedpods as fruits
3.carob - powder from the ground seeds and pods of the carob tree; used as a chocolate substitute
food product, foodstuff - a substance that can be used or prepared for use as food
algarroba, algarroba bean, carob, carob bean, locust bean, locust pod - long pod containing small beans and sweetish edible pulp; used as animal feed and source of a chocolate substitute
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
johanneksenleipäpuu
rogač
johannesbroodjohannesbroodboom

carob

[ˈkærəb] N (= bean) → algarroba f; (= tree) → algarrobo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

carob

nJohannisbrotbaum m; (= fruit)Johannisbrot nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

carob

[ˈkærəb] ncarrubo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
A THE term carat goes back to ancient Greece and the Middle East, when carob beans were used to weigh precious metals.
They love carob beans. Feral cats will be on the prowl, coolly waiting until I am aroused at 4am by a mad chase and take a powerful hosepipe to them all; the rats are stealing, the cats are causing an affray and I using the hosepipe illegally.
And stabilisers - like locust bean gum (E410) which is made from carob beans - help stop these ingredients from separating again.