carouse

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ca·rouse

 (kə-rouz′)
intr.v. ca·roused, ca·rous·ing, ca·rous·es
To drink large amounts of alcohol, especially in boisterous merrymaking.
n.
Carousal.

[Earlier, a cup drunk up completely in one draft as a toast, from French, carous as in French (boire) carous, (to drink a cup) up completely in one draft, from German gar aus(trinken), (to drink) up completely (used in such exhortations as trinks gar aus, drink it all up) : gar, completely (from Middle High German, from Old High German garo; akin to archaic English yare, ready) + aus, out, up; see auslander.]

ca·rous′er n.
Word History: From an etymological point of view, carousing is chugalugging. Carouse ultimately comes from German gar aus, words forming part of the exhortation trinks gar aus, "drink it all up!" with which German revelers urged their drinking companions to drain their cups. The phrase trinks gar aus is repeated, for example, at the end of one of the most popular German drinking songs of the 1500s, So trinken wir alle ("So drink we all"). Gar aus, "completely up," had already spread to French by the middle of the 1500s as carous, also spelled carrousse. This word was used in such phrases as boire carous, "to drink by draining a cup dry in one draft, chug." (The change of the initial German g to c in French carous may reflect a Swiss dialectal pronunciation of g, which may have sounded like c or k to French ears.) French carrousse soon made its way into English as carouse. In the 1500s, English carouse was often used as an adverb in such phrases as to quaff carouse, "to drink dry in one draft," but it could also function as a noun meaning "a cup drunk dry in toasting someone's health." Such drinks were typically tossed back in company, and when done so repeatedly, this soon led to what we now call carousing.

carouse

(kəˈraʊz)
vb
(intr) to have a merry drinking spree; drink freely
n
another word for carousal
[C16: via French carrousser from German (trinken) gar aus (to drink) right out]
caˈrouser n
caˈrousing n

ca•rouse

(kəˈraʊz)

v. -roused, -rous•ing,
n. v.i.
1. to engage in a carousal.
2. to drink deeply and frequently.
n.
[1550–60; variant of garouse < German gar aus (trinken) to drain the cup]
ca•rous′er, n.

carouse


Past participle: caroused
Gerund: carousing

Imperative
carouse
carouse
Present
I carouse
you carouse
he/she/it carouses
we carouse
you carouse
they carouse
Preterite
I caroused
you caroused
he/she/it caroused
we caroused
you caroused
they caroused
Present Continuous
I am carousing
you are carousing
he/she/it is carousing
we are carousing
you are carousing
they are carousing
Present Perfect
I have caroused
you have caroused
he/she/it has caroused
we have caroused
you have caroused
they have caroused
Past Continuous
I was carousing
you were carousing
he/she/it was carousing
we were carousing
you were carousing
they were carousing
Past Perfect
I had caroused
you had caroused
he/she/it had caroused
we had caroused
you had caroused
they had caroused
Future
I will carouse
you will carouse
he/she/it will carouse
we will carouse
you will carouse
they will carouse
Future Perfect
I will have caroused
you will have caroused
he/she/it will have caroused
we will have caroused
you will have caroused
they will have caroused
Future Continuous
I will be carousing
you will be carousing
he/she/it will be carousing
we will be carousing
you will be carousing
they will be carousing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been carousing
you have been carousing
he/she/it has been carousing
we have been carousing
you have been carousing
they have been carousing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been carousing
you will have been carousing
he/she/it will have been carousing
we will have been carousing
you will have been carousing
they will have been carousing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been carousing
you had been carousing
he/she/it had been carousing
we had been carousing
you had been carousing
they had been carousing
Conditional
I would carouse
you would carouse
he/she/it would carouse
we would carouse
you would carouse
they would carouse
Past Conditional
I would have caroused
you would have caroused
he/she/it would have caroused
we would have caroused
you would have caroused
they would have caroused
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carouse - revelry in drinkingcarouse - revelry in drinking; a merry drinking party
revel, revelry - unrestrained merrymaking
Verb1.carouse - engage in boisterous, drunken merrymaking; "They were out carousing last night"
jollify, make happy, make merry, make whoopie, racket, wassail, whoop it up, revel - celebrate noisily, often indulging in drinking; engage in uproarious festivities; "The members of the wedding party made merry all night"; "Let's whoop it up--the boss is gone!"

carouse

verb drink, booze (informal), revel, imbibe, quaff, pub-crawl (informal, chiefly Brit.), bevvy (dialect), make merry, bend the elbow (informal), roister, go on the piss (taboo slang) He should stay home with his wife more, instead of going out and carousing with friends.

carouse

noun
A drinking bout:
Slang: bat, bender, booze, jag, tear.
verb
Translations
يُشارِكُ في جَلْسَةِ شَرابصاخِبَه
hýřitpopíjet
svire
mulat
svalla
išgertuvėslėbautipuota
dzīrot
hýriťpopíjať
içki âlemine katılmak

carouse

[kəˈraʊz] VI (liter) → ir de juerga or jarana

carouse

[kəˈraʊz] vifaire la bringue

carouse

vi (old)zechen, Gelage feiern

carouse

[kəˈraʊz] vifar baldoria

carouse

(kəˈrauz) verb
to take part in a noisy drinking session.
caˈrousal noun
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