chondrocyte

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Related to cartilage cell: bone cell, cell organ

chon·dro·cyte

 (kŏn′drə-sīt′)
n.
A cartilage cell located in a lacuna of the cartilage matrix.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The model demonstrated that both menisectomy and osteoarthritic changes to the cartilage cause significant alterations in cartilage cell responses.
The thickness of the cartilage of the knee joint in the Ecd treated animals may either be the result of less cartilage cell death or of increased cartilage cell production or both.
For example, in a rabbit model there is early evidence that the use of enzyme inhibitors might decrease joint cartilage cell death following trauma, and that they might also prevent the loss of important molecular components within the cartilage (Arthritis Rheum.
The first human application of cartilage cell transplantation or otherwise known as autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) was performed in 1994 by Lars Peterson and Matts Brittberg from the University of Gothenburg in Sweden (Figures 2 and 3) (Brittberg et al 1994).
Chondrogenesis is the process by which a mesenchymal cell--a type of stem cell already assigned to become connective tissue or blood cells--turns into a cartilage cell, or chondrocyte.
Using a biochemical cocktail of different steroids and growth factors, the researchers demonstrated that they could "retrain" specific cells that would normally form the structure of fat into another type of cell known as a chondrocyte, or cartilage cell.
In laboratory tests, Rath found that cartilage cell death in the growth plate near the ends of the bones prevents the cartilage tissue from being replaced by new living cells and bone tissue.
The successful development of a cartilage cell bank could also pave the way for treatment of degenerative cartilage damage such as that seen in osteoarthritis, Fusion IP added.
Furthermore, the studies have demonstrated that there are differences in the level of cartilage cell stimulation from no stimulation at all to the FORTIGEL level.
From "bionic" shoulder repairs to cutting-edge knee cartilage cell transplants that cost as much as $50,000, more boomers are seeking internal nips and tucks to keep them young.
Moreover he added that the company believes that the BioCart technology addresses some of the major limitations associated with microfracture procedures as well as current generation autologous cartilage cell transplantation technologies.
We believe that the BioCart([TM]) technology addresses some of the major limitations associated with microfracture procedures as well as current generation autologous cartilage cell transplantation technologies.