caruncle

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ca·run·cle

 (kə-rŭng′kəl, kăr′ŭng′-)
n.
1. Biology A fleshy naked outgrowth, such as a fowl's wattles.
2. Botany An outgrowth or appendage at or near the hilum of certain seeds, as of the castor-oil plant.

[Obsolete French caruncule, from Latin caruncula, diminutive of carō, flesh; see sker- in Indo-European roots.]

ca·run′cu·lar (-kyə-lər) adj.
ca·run′cu·late (-lĭt, -lāt′), ca·run′cu·lat′ed (-lā′tĭd) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

caruncle

(ˈkærəŋkəl; kəˈrʌŋ-)
n
1. (Zoology) a fleshy outgrowth on the heads of certain birds, such as a cock's comb
2. (Botany) an outgrowth near the hilum on the seeds of some plants
3. (Pathology) any small fleshy mass in or on the body, either natural or abnormal
[C17: from obsolete French caruncule, from Latin caruncula a small piece of flesh, from carō flesh]
caruncular, caˈrunculous adj
carunculate, caˈruncuˌlated adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

car•un•cle

(ˈkær ʌŋ kəl, kəˈrʌŋ-)

n.
1. a protuberance at or surrounding the hilum of a seed.
2. a fleshy excrescence, as on the head of a bird; a fowl's comb.
[1605–15; < Latin caruncula small piece of flesh, diminutive of carō, s. carn- flesh; for suffix, see carbuncle]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.caruncle - an outgrowth on a plant or animal such as a fowl's wattle or a protuberance near the hilum of certain seedscaruncle - an outgrowth on a plant or animal such as a fowl's wattle or a protuberance near the hilum of certain seeds
appendage, outgrowth, process - a natural prolongation or projection from a part of an organism either animal or plant; "a bony process"
lappet, wattle - a fleshy wrinkled and often brightly colored fold of skin hanging from the neck or throat of certain birds (chickens and turkeys) or lizards
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

ca·run·cle

n. carúncula, pequeña irritación de la piel;
urethral ___uretral.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Although caruncles are usually benign, they should be surgically excised and histopathologically examined since they may be the indicators of lymphoma, clitoral venous thrombosis, urethral thrombosis, pseudoneoplastic lesions, urethral polyps, malign melanoma, intestinal heterotypic, angiomatous lesions, and diastolic urethral stenosis (5,6,7,8,9,10,11).
Melanomas may be confused with urethral polyps, mucosal prolapse or caruncles [14].
The effect of removal of a endometrial caruncles on fetal size and metabolism," Journal of Developmental Physiology, vol.
Urethral caruncles (UCs) are benign fleshy outgrowths at the urethral meatus [1].
The caprine endometrium differed from human in that it had glandular intercaruncles and aglandular caruncles. To evaluate anestrus and breeding uteri, cells were isolated from the whole caprine endometrium including both caruncle and intercaruncle areas.
[5] Benign aetiologies include urethral caruncles, Skene's gland abscess/cysts, mucosal prolapse, ectopic ureterocoele, urethral diverticulum, vaginal wall cysts, Gartner's duct cysts, leiomyomas and hamartomas.
(2005) reported that hill ewes had larger caruncles in uterus as a result of breed adaptation to cope with poor nutrition during pregnancy thereby increasing the efficiency with which nutrients are transferred to the fetus.
He tried to get Ellies attention but she was petting one of the gobblettas with purple caruncles and acted as if she didn't hear him.
Influence of number of size of caruncles (placental cotyledons) in the cow on the vitality of new born calves.
Uterine involution involves the contraction of the uterus, sloughing of the caruncles and regeneration of the endometrium (Gier and Marion, 1968).
(1977) pointed out that, as the number of fetuses increases, the number of caruncles attached to each foetus decrease thus resulting in the reduction of feed supply to the foetus and hence the birth weight of those lambs decreases in multiple births.
The PPARG is expressed at all stages during bovine embryo development (both in the inner mass and in the trophectoderm [38]) and in the placenta (cotyledons and caruncles) of bovine [39] and sheep [40], with an evident expression in the trophoblast [41].