case-fatality proportion


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Noun1.case-fatality proportion - the number of cases of a disease ending in death divided by the number of cases of the disease; usually expressed as a percentage or as the number of deaths per 1000 cases
proportion - the quotient obtained when the magnitude of a part is divided by the magnitude of the whole
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The case-fatality proportion for all clusters combined was 35% (29/84), similar to that for all sporadic infections (40%) (Table).
The cumulative case-fatality proportion for confirmed H5N1 cases since January 2004 is 73% (Vietnam: 27 cases, 20 deaths; Thailand: 17 cases, 12 deaths).
By 17 April 2003, there were 3,389 suspected/probable cases of SARS in 25 countries with 165 deaths or a case-fatality proportion of 5% (WHO 2003b).
As of March 31, 2017, a total of 1,336 cases of laboratory-confirmed A(H7N9) virus infections were detected; case-fatality proportion was "40%.
During November 1, 2002-July 2, 2003, a total of 8,442 probable SARS cases were reported to WHO from 29 countries, including 73 cases from the United States; 812 deaths (case-fatality proportion: 9.6%) have been reported, with no SARS-related deaths reported from the United States (1).
We calculated the case-fatality proportion for all patients in Bo District for whom outcome was known, who were admitted to a healthcare facility, and who were admitted to the ETU.
During November 1, 2002-June 18, 2003, a total of 8,465 probable SARS cases were reported to 'WHO from 29 countries, including 75 from the United States; 801 deaths (case-fatality proportion: 9.5%) have been reported, with no SARS-related deaths reported from the United States (1).
The overall case-fatality proportion was similar for female and male patients (14.1% vs.
During November 1,2002-June 11,2003, a total of 8,435 probable SARS cases were reported to WHO from 29 countries, including 70 from the United States; 789 deaths (case-fatality proportion: 9.4%) have been reported, with no SARS-related deaths reported from the United States (1).
While mortality rates remained relatively low, as in 2006, the case-fatality proportion rose to 13.1% in cattle and 41.5% in sheep.
During November 1, 2002--June 4, 2003, a total of 8,402 SARS cases were reported to WHO from 29 countries, including the United States; 772 deaths (case-fatality proportion: 9.2%) have been reported (1).
An alternative explanation for the absence of antibodies would be that the case-fatality proportion was higher than observed during the outbreaks in Durba and Watsa (71%) (3).