caseload

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case·load

 (kās′lōd′)
n.
The number of cases handled in a given period, as by an attorney or by a clinic or social services agency.

caseload

(ˈkeɪsləʊd)
n
1. (Law) the number of cases constituting the work of a doctor, solicitor, social worker, etc over a specified period
2. (Social Welfare) the number of cases constituting the work of a doctor, solicitor, social worker, etc over a specified period
3. (Medicine) the number of cases constituting the work of a doctor, solicitor, social worker, etc over a specified period

case′load`

or case′ load`,



n.
the number of cases handled by a court, agency, social worker, etc., over a stated period.
[1945–50]
Translations

caseload

[ˈkeɪsləʊd] n [doctor, social worker] → nombre m de dossiers
References in periodicals archive ?
In March 2018, he found there were "cognizable reasons" to conclude that almost all of the assistant public defenders had caseloads so heavy they "would be unable to provide effective assistance of counsel."
The formula relies not just on straight caseloads but also represents "the average bench and non-bench time (in minutes) required to reach a disposition in each case type," the Judiciary stated in its report prepared by its Administrative Office of the Courts.
Three out of four countywide public defender systems and fifteen out of twenty-two statewide public defender systems operate with yearly caseloads that are significantly higher than the ABA recommends.
The effects of the opioid epidemic on the criminal justice and health systems have been well documented, while the relationship between substance use and child welfare caseloads has been largely anecdotal, until now.
She said: "Our people are grappling with more calls, incidents, crimes and caseloads." The deputy chief constable made the comments in a guest post for a blog published by Dave Thompson, chief constable of West Midlands Police.
"The drop in caseloads seemed to coincide with the drop in the economy, but we can't absolutely say with any degree of certainty that the recession is causing this," said Neil LaFountain, senior research analyst at the National Center on State Courts (NCSC).
"Other states sued by Children's Rights lawsuits have been forced to comply with costly reforms, such as a court-ordered monitor, new computer systems and mandated reduced caseloads, which requires the hiring of more workers," CPS wrote in 2014.
And then there's a more prolonged meeting every two months where we get together and talk about practice issues, things that would happen at access holders meetings, discuss our caseloads, and work out who was going to cover and be 2nd midwife for each other's clients.
I think that there's probably a bigger problem with high caseloads in the urban areas like London, Manchester, Birmingham, whereas in some of the more rural areas it's less of a problem.
The trouble arises for several reasons in addition to sheer volume, but the Legislature is looking at a single solution, and it's a heavy-handed one: House Bill 3300 would get primary care physicians to increase their Medicaid caseloads by using another set of patients as both carrot and stick.