casement


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case·ment

 (kās′mənt)
n.
1.
a. A window sash that opens outward by means of hinges.
b. A window with such sashes.
2. A case or covering.

[Middle English, a hollow molding, possibly from Middle English case, chest, frame; see case2.]

case′ment·ed adj.

casement

(ˈkeɪsmənt)
n
1. (Architecture) a window frame that is hinged on one side
2. (Architecture) a window containing frames hinged at the side or at the top or bottom
3. a poetic word for window
[C15: probably from Old Northern French encassement frame, from encasser to frame, encase, from casse framework, crate, case2]

Casement

(ˈkeɪsmənt)
n
(Biography) Sir Roger (David). 1864–1916, British diplomat and Irish nationalist: hanged by the British for treason in attempting to gain German support for Irish independence

case•ment

(ˈkeɪs mənt)

n.
1. a window sash opening on hinges that are generally attached to the upright side of its frame.
2. Also called case′ment win′dow. a window with such a sash or sashes.
3. a casing or covering.
[1375–1425]
case′ment•ed, adj.

Case•ment

(ˈkeɪs mənt)

n.
(Sir) Roger (David), 1864–1916, Irish patriot: hanged by the British for treason.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.casement - a window sash that is hinged (usually on one side)casement - a window sash that is hinged (usually on one side)
sash, window sash - a framework that holds the panes of a window in the window frame
Translations

casement

[ˈkeɪsmənt] N (also casement window) → ventana f de bisagras; (= frame) → marco m de ventana

casement

[ˈkeɪsmənt] n (also casement window) → croisée fcase-sensitive [ˌkeɪsˈsɛnsɪtɪv] adj (COMPUTING) [word] → sensible à la cassecase study nétude f de cascasework [ˈkeɪswɜːrk] n [social worker] → assistance f individuelle

casement

n (= window)Flügelfenster nt; (= frame)Fensterflügel m

casement

[ˈkeɪsmənt] n (window) → finestra
References in classic literature ?
There was a moment during which I listened, reminded of the faint sense I had had, the first night, of there being something undefinably astir in the house, and noted the soft breath of the open casement just move the half-drawn blind.
Whilst I was thus closely scanning him, half-pretending meanwhile to be looking out at the storm from the casement, he never heeded my presence, never troubled himself with so much as a single glance; but appeared wholly occupied with counting the pages of the marvellous book.
She was in the adjoining chamber while she still spoke, and opening the casement there, immediately called Mr.
She was sitting near the window, and as soon as Sir John perceived her, he left the rest of the party to the ceremony of knocking at the door, and stepping across the turf, obliged her to open the casement to speak to him, though the space was so short between the door and the window, as to make it hardly possible to speak at one without being heard at the other.
All this being nothing to me, my vacant attention soon found livelier attraction in the spectacle of a little hungry robin, which came and chirruped on the twigs of the leafless cherry-tree nailed against the wall near the casement.
This time, I remembered I was lying in the oak closet, and I heard distinctly the gusty wind, and the driving of the snow; I heard, also, the fir bough repeat its teasing sound, and ascribed it to the right cause: but it annoyed me so much, that I resolved to silence it, if possible; and, I thought, I rose and endeavoured to unhasp the casement.
I was the butt of a hundred arrows; they rattled on mine armour like hailstones against a latticed casement, and the only use I made of my shield was for her protection.
I pulled and pulled at the door, and shook it till, massive as it was, it rattled in its casement.
I open wide my casement To breathe the rain-cooled air.
Hold your tongue, stupid fellow," said D'Artagnan; and laying hold of the casement, he let himself gently down from the first story, which fortunately was not very elevated, without doing himself the slightest injury.
If a passing wind lingered to shake the casement, he strove to turn his head towards it; if the door jarred to and fro upon its hinges, he looked long and anxiously thitherward; if the heavy voice of the old man, as he read the Scriptures, rose but a little higher, the child almost held his dying breath to listen; if a snow-drift swept by the cottage, with a sound like the trailing of a garment, Ilbrahim seemed to watch that some visitant should enter.
I stepped to the unobstructed casement, withdrew the nail with some difficulty and attempted to raise the sash.