cassava


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Related to cassava: cassava starch, yam

cas·sa·va

 (kə-sä′və)
n.
1. A shrubby tropical American plant (Manihot esculenta) widely grown for its large, tuberous, starchy roots.
2. The root of this plant, eaten as a staple food in the tropics only after leaching and drying to remove cyanide. Cassava starch is also the source of tapioca. In both senses also called manioc, yuca.

[Ultimately from Taíno casavi, flour from manioc.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cassava

(kəˈsɑːvə)
n
1. (Plants) Also called: manioc any tropical euphorbiaceous plant of the genus Manihot, esp the widely cultivated American species M. esculenta (or utilissima) (bitter cassava) and M. dulcis (sweet cassava)
2. (Cookery) a starch derived from the root of this plant: an important food in the tropics and a source of tapioca
[C16: from Spanish cazabe cassava bread, from Taino caçábi]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cas•sa•va

(kəˈsɑ və)

n., pl. -vas.
1. any of several tropical American plants belonging to the genus Manihot, of the spurge family, having tuberous roots.
2. a nutritious starch from the roots, the source of tapioca.
[1545–55; < Sp cazabe cassava bread or meal < Taino]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

cassava

A root vegetable resembling a large, brown sweet potato.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cassava - a starch made by leaching and drying the root of the cassava plantcassava - a starch made by leaching and drying the root of the cassava plant; the source of tapioca; a staple food in the tropics
tapioca - granular preparation of cassava starch used to thicken especially puddings
amylum, starch - a complex carbohydrate found chiefly in seeds, fruits, tubers, roots and stem pith of plants, notably in corn, potatoes, wheat, and rice; an important foodstuff and used otherwise especially in adhesives and as fillers and stiffeners for paper and textiles
2.cassava - cassava root eaten as a staple food after drying and leachingcassava - cassava root eaten as a staple food after drying and leaching; source of tapioca
tapioca - granular preparation of cassava starch used to thicken especially puddings
bitter cassava, gari, mandioc, mandioca, Manihot esculenta, Manihot utilissima, tapioca plant, manioc - cassava with long tuberous edible roots and soft brittle stems; used especially to make cassiri (an intoxicating drink) and tapioca
root - (botany) the usually underground organ that lacks buds or leaves or nodes; absorbs water and mineral salts; usually it anchors the plant to the ground
3.cassava - any of several plants of the genus Manihot having fleshy roots yielding a nutritious starch
genus Manihot, Manihot - genus of economically important tropical plants: cassava
bitter cassava, gari, mandioc, mandioca, Manihot esculenta, Manihot utilissima, tapioca plant, manioc - cassava with long tuberous edible roots and soft brittle stems; used especially to make cassiri (an intoxicating drink) and tapioca
Manihot dulcis, sweet cassava - South American plant with roots used as a vegetable and herbage used for stock feed
bush, shrub - a low woody perennial plant usually having several major stems
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
نَباتٌ اسْتِوائي يُنْتِجُ تابْيوكا
maniok
maniokplante
kasszava
manjokrunni
manijokas
manioks
maniok
manyok

cassava

[kəˈsɑːvə] Nmandioca f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cassava

[kəˈsɑːvə] n (= plant) → manioc m (= food) → manioc m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cassava

nManiok m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

cassava

(kəˈsaːvə) noun
(also tapioca plant) a tropical plant, whose roots yield tapioca.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
"Another white man `came in peace' three moons ago," replied Kaviri; "and after we had brought him presents of a goat and cassava and milk, he set upon us with his guns and killed many of my people, and then went on his way, taking all of our goats and many of our young men and women."
Before each hut a woman presided over a boiling stew, while little cakes of plantain, and cassava puddings were to be seen on every hand.
She had eaten the meal that had been brought her by Mohammed Beyd's Negro slave--a meal of cassava cakes and a nondescript stew in which a new-killed monkey, a couple of squirrels and the remains of a zebra, slain the previous day, were impartially and unsavorily combined; but the one-time Baltimore belle had long since submerged in the stern battle for existence, an estheticism which formerly revolted at much slighter provocation.
I searched for the cassava root, which the Indians, in all that climate, make their bread of, but I could find none.
Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is perennial woody shrub with a starchy edible root.
In the light of this, cocoyam, cassava, taro and other tuber crops have been found to be alternative sources of major raw materials for bread making (6).
Cassava has long been Central African Republic's number-one staple crop, and is key to keeping hunger at bay.
Cassava roots yield more carbohydrates per hectare than cereal crops and can be grown at a considerably lower cost [1].
Among the country's top vegetable and root crops are mongo, peanut, cabbage, eggplant, tomato, sweet potato and cassava.
An independent audit team sent by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, to audit its cassava project in Nigeria, has commended the National Agricultural Seed Council (NASC) for its cassava seed tracker system.
In a wok nearby, pieces of cassava are sizzling in oil and will be ready in less than five minutes.