cassolette


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Related to cassolette: cassoulet

cassolette

(ˈkæsəˌlɛt)
n
1. a small casserole
2. a small dish in which a casserole is served
3. a perforated box or vase which emits perfume
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
W Verbier has a number of restaurants including the modern W Kitchen which services traditional Swiss cuisine such as snail cassolette, beef entrecote and pan fried pike perch.
"It's a fantastic opportunity to try our new spring menu which includes new and classic French flavours - from our poulet printanier to our newly introduced cassolette de moules - which is a baked ramekin of mussels, spinach and a garlic cream sauce served with sourdough toast, a new firm favourite in our bistrot."
He pairs an egg cassolette with wild Oregon onions, morels, fiddlehead ferns and asparagus with an herbal red such as the cabernet franc-based Domaine des Roches Neuves Terre Chaudes Saumur Champigny ($45 a bottle) from the Loire Valley.
The highlight of the new menu is the Cassolette concept - slow cooked meat, poultry, fish, and cheese dishes, prepared in a cast-iron pot.
"The French take the subject so seriously they even have a word for the scent of a woman when perfume is mingled with body oil: her cassolette," he added.
The cassolette epicurienne comprised of a small, deep-fried breadcrumb basket filled with fragrant morels, wild mushrooms and a glace de viande (a powerful beef essence).
Muller, Jewels in Spain, discusses several jewels and jeweled cases which are similar in use and/or design to cultres, including a hollow (?) tubular cross described in 1503 (18), a Hispano-Moresque cassolette (23), a reliquary pendant "with two small half-doors" probably from the collection of Juana la Loca (51; cf.
(8) Scented pastilles placed in the silver insert within the middle section (only the example in Figures 3 and 4 still retains this component) released a perfume when warmed, the veilleuse thus acting as a cassolette (perfume burner).
You have no idea whether your chap fancies what the French call your normal 'cassolette' (unadorned skin scent).