castaway


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cast·a·way

 (kăst′ə-wā′)
adj.
1. Cast adrift or ashore; shipwrecked.
2. Discarded; thrown away.
n.
1. A shipwrecked person.
2. A rejected or discarded person or thing.

castaway

(ˈkɑːstəˌweɪ)
n
1. a person who has been shipwrecked
2. something thrown off or away; castoff
adj (prenominal)
3. (Nautical Terms) shipwrecked or put adrift
4. thrown away or rejected
vb
(Nautical Terms) (tr, adverb; often passive) to cause (a ship, person, etc) to be shipwrecked or abandoned

cast•a•way

(ˈkæst əˌweɪ, ˈkɑst-)

n.
1. a shipwrecked person.
2. anything cast adrift or thrown away.
3. an outcast.
adj.
4. cast adrift.
5. thrown away.
[1520–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.castaway - a person who is rejected (from society or home)
unfortunate, unfortunate person - a person who suffers misfortune
heretic, misbeliever, religious outcast - a person who holds religious beliefs in conflict with the dogma of the Roman Catholic Church
leper - a pariah who is avoided by others
Harijan, untouchable - belongs to lowest social and ritual class in India
2.castaway - a shipwrecked personcastaway - a shipwrecked person      
abandoned person - someone for whom hope has been abandoned
Translations
النّاجي مِن سَفينَةٍ غارِقَه
trosečník
skibbruden
hajótöröttkitaszított
skipbrotsmaîur

castaway

[ˈkɑːstəweɪ] Nnáufrago/a m/f

castaway

[ˈkɑːstəweɪ] nnaufragé(e) m/f

castaway

n (lit, fig)Schiffbrüchige(r) mf

castaway

[ˈkæstəweɪ] nnaufrago/a

cast

(kaːst) past tense past participle cast verb
1. to throw. The angler cast his line into the river; These facts cast new light on the matter; She cast him a look of hatred.
2. to get rid of; to take off. Some snakes cast their skins.
3. to shape (metal etc) by pouring into a mould. Metal is melted before it is cast.
4. to give a part in a play etc to. She was cast as Lady Macbeth.
5. to select the actors for (a film etc). The director is casting (the film) tomorrow.
6. to give (a vote). I cast my vote for the younger candidate.
noun
1. a throw. At his third cast he caught a fish.
2. something made by moulding. The doctor put a plaster cast on his broken leg.
3. a mould. The hot metal is poured into a cast.
4. the complete set of actors in a play, opera etc. the whole cast of the play.
5. something that is ejected by certain animals, eg the earthworm. worm casts all over the grass.
ˈcastaway noun
a shipwrecked person.
casting vote
the deciding vote of the chairman of a meeting when the other votes are equally divided.
cast iron
unpurified iron melted and shaped in a mould.
ˈcast-iron adjective
1. made of cast iron. a cast-iron frying-pan.
2. very strong. cast-iron muscles.
ˈcast-off noun, adjective
(a piece of clothing etc) no longer needed. cast-off clothes; I don't want my sister's cast-offs.
cast off
1. to untie (the mooring lines of a boat).
2. (also cast aside) to reject as unwanted.
3. in knitting, to finish (the final row of stitches).
cast on
in knitting, to make the first row of stitches.
References in classic literature ?
Out from the centre of the sea, poor Pip turned his crisp, curling, black head to the sun, another lonely castaway, though the loftiest and the brightest.
I was as much of a stranger as the most hopeless castaway stumbling in the dark upon a hut of natives and finding them in the grip of some situation appertaining to the mentalities, prejudices, and problems of an undiscovered country - of a country of which he had not even had one single clear glimpse before.
"Yes; he was a castaway. A poor emigrant from Central Europe bound to America and washed ashore here in a storm.
Having myself in past times seen this clerical castaway making one of the players at Lady Verinder's whist-table, I doubt, even if I had been fit to travel, whether I should have felt justified in attending the ceremony.
She's at the bottom o' the stairs, and wants to know if you think well to see her, for she has something to say to you about that poor castaway; but she wouldn't come in without your leave, she said.
The last he wrote was called The Castaway, and the verse with which it ends describes not unfittingly the close of his own life.
Yea, woe to him who, as the great Pilot Paul has it, while preaching to others is himself a castaway! He drooped and fell away from himself for a moment; then lifting his face to them again, showed a deep joy in his eyes, as he cried out with a heavenly enthusiasm, -- but oh!
"My dear children," pursued the black marble clergyman, with pathos, "this is a sad, a melancholy occasion; for it becomes my duty to warn you, that this girl, who might be one of God's own lambs, is a little castaway: not a member of the true flock, but evidently an interloper and an alien.
you are a castaway - be off, or I'll hurt you seriously!
And the God who had taken care o me, a castaway, would surely deliver her also from the hands of murderers and thieves.
This ambiguous conduct led them to believe that the natives had ill-treated the castaways, and indeed they seemed to fear that Dumont d'Urville had come to avenge La Perouse and his unfortunate crew.
As the whirl of dust drew nearer to the solitary bluff upon which the two castaways were reposing, the canvas-covered tilts of waggons and the figures of armed horsemen began to show up through the haze, and the apparition revealed itself as being a great caravan upon its journey for the West.