castrato

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ca·stra·to

 (kă-strä′tō, kə-)
n. pl. ca·stra·ti (-tē) or ca·stra·tos
A male singer castrated before puberty so as to retain a soprano or alto voice.

[Italian, from Latin castrātus, past participle of castrāre, to castrate; see castrate.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

castrato

(kæˈstrɑːtəʊ)
n, pl -ti (-tɪ) or -tos
(Classical Music) (in 17th- and 18th-century opera) a male singer whose testicles were removed before puberty, allowing the retention of a soprano or alto voice
[C18: from Italian, from Latin castrātus castrated]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cas•tra•to

(kæˈstrɑ toʊ, kə-)

n., pl. -ti (-ti)
a male singer, esp. in the 18th century, castrated before puberty to prevent his soprano or contralto voice range from changing.
[1755–65; < Italian < Latin castrātus]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

castrato

An adult male voice in soprano or contralto range achieved by castration to prevent voice deepening. Found in European church choirs in seventeenth and eighteenth century and a popular voice for operatic composers such as Handel.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.castrato - a male singer who was castrated before puberty and retains a soprano or alto voice
singer, vocalist, vocalizer, vocaliser - a person who sings
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
kastrat

castrato

[kæsˈtrɑːtəʊ] N (castrato or castrati (pl)) [kæsˈtrɑːtɪ]castrato m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

castrato

n pl <castrati> → Kastrat m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Interestingly, it's become so accepted today to use a countertenor instead of a woman to sing the castrati roles, yet we still can't get around the whole issue of gender expectations or gender associations, because you still know it's a man singing, even if the person dresses differently or is very good at assuming a part.
Restoring the dances in the finale cut by Berlioz, the Toronto company nevertheless adopted his reassignment of the role of Orphee to a mezzo (a common practice these days even for companies staging the original Vienna version of 1762, given the unavailability of castrati), enabling Mireille Lebel to sing some of the ornamentation Berlioz allowed Pauline Viardot to add to her part.
Women were banned from Vatican choirs but Italian castrati began to attract rich patrons among cardinals and kings.
This was perfectly appropriate for a concert of music from her album Sacrificium which explores works performed by opera's most exotic performers, the castrati, who combined glorious singing with gender-bending and a dash of theatrical camp.
While many singers are happily recording their Nessun Dormas and O Sole Mios, Cecilia has been busy in the archives of Naples digging out relatively unknown Baroque castrati music, tracking down now neglected composers such as Nicola Porpora, Antonio Caldara and Francesco Araia.
Extremely popular in the 17th century, interest waned until the 20th century increased popularity of Baroque opera and the need of male singers to replace the castrati roles in such works.
They include Por Vos Muero, Castrati, and White Darkness, all of them reflecting Duato's dramatic blend of ballet and contemporary techniques and European theatricality.
Handel House hosts this exhibition curated by countertenor Nicholas Clapton telling the story of the seven castrati singers who most frequently worked for Handel.
Scholz, Eunuchs and Castrati: A Cultural History, 2001) to specific investigations (D.
Indeed, many eunuchs were associated with the church, some as singers in church choirs more than a millennium before the castrati took on that role in Europe.