castrato

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Related to castratos: Castrado

ca·stra·to

 (kă-strä′tō, kə-)
n. pl. ca·stra·ti (-tē) or ca·stra·tos
A male singer castrated before puberty so as to retain a soprano or alto voice.

[Italian, from Latin castrātus, past participle of castrāre, to castrate; see castrate.]

castrato

(kæˈstrɑːtəʊ)
n, pl -ti (-tɪ) or -tos
(Classical Music) (in 17th- and 18th-century opera) a male singer whose testicles were removed before puberty, allowing the retention of a soprano or alto voice
[C18: from Italian, from Latin castrātus castrated]

cas•tra•to

(kæˈstrɑ toʊ, kə-)

n., pl. -ti (-ti)
a male singer, esp. in the 18th century, castrated before puberty to prevent his soprano or contralto voice range from changing.
[1755–65; < Italian < Latin castrātus]

castrato

An adult male voice in soprano or contralto range achieved by castration to prevent voice deepening. Found in European church choirs in seventeenth and eighteenth century and a popular voice for operatic composers such as Handel.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.castrato - a male singer who was castrated before puberty and retains a soprano or alto voice
singer, vocalist, vocalizer, vocaliser - a person who sings
Translations
kastrat

castrato

[kæsˈtrɑːtəʊ] N (castrato or castrati (pl)) [kæsˈtrɑːtɪ]castrato m

castrato

n pl <castrati> → Kastrat m
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Seduction, voyeurism, masquerade balls, the Inquisition, cross-dressing castratos and abusive husbands are just a few of the events and characters from Casanova's life that are dramatised in this ballet.
Howard points out that it was doubly propitious because Handel had rarely used castratos in his oratorios after 1737.
Feldman begins at what she terms "castrato voice ground zero," an account made by Hungarian musicologist Paul Henry Lang of a supposed 1912 concert performance of "two castratos who toured Europe with the Sistine Chapel Choir" (p.
She and the others on the committee of castratos were there because they could never rise to the task in hand.
Castratos had their testicles removed around age eight on the orders of the Vatican (
We countertenors are the heritage of the castratos," says Khodr, adding that the tune from "Partenope" is "beautiful, it's gorgeous.