casualization

(redirected from casualised)

casualization

(ˌkæʒjʊəlaɪˈzeɪʃən) or

casualisation

n
(Industrial Relations & HR Terms) the altering of working practices so that regular workers are re-employed on a casual or short-term basis
Translations

casualization

casualisation [ˌkæʒuəlaɪˈzeɪʃən] (British) n [labour, employment] → précarisation f
References in periodicals archive ?
Liam Dann (2016) draws attention to: low wage growth; casualised, part time work; increasing inequity and poverty; uncertain rewards for investment leading to over-investment in housing and consequent instability of banks and economy; and the possibility of imported deflation.
But unions complained the report's recommendations do not go far enough to protect workers in the casualised modern economy.
governments have tolerated what Simon Deakin described as "the shrinking of the industrial base, while actively encouraging the growth of a casualised labour market, characterized by growing self-employment (often a front for very insecure employment), agency work, and zero hours contracting.
15) It is not clear that someone in fact working under one or more zero hours contracts, at the casualised end of the market, would think of themselves as in employment.
Meanwhile, university administrators cut back on women's and labour studies programs and relied upon a growing pool of casualised adjunct faculty and precariously employed administrative staff.
When some worry that Uber is wrecking work, we need to remind ourselves, as The Economist wrote last year of the contingent workforce, "that the on-demand economy is not introducing the serpent of casual labour into the garden of full employment: it is exploiting an already casualised workforce in ways that will ameliorate some problems even as they aggravate others.
Caroline Sewell, from the Musicians Union, said: "I think driving some people out of business is a very real possibility and not just for musicians but for any workers in a casualised workforce, those who don't work under employment contracts, are self-employed or freelance.
a younger generation burdened with debt, facing the prospects of never owning their own home, entering a workforce that is increasingly precarious and casualised and living on a planet at risk from climate change
Teacher employment patterns are reported typically to be more casualised and contractual than they were decades ago.
The games industry is usually considered exemplary of the structures of global production in 'an era of spatially dispersed and casualised labour under a global regime of huge media conglomerates (Miller, 2016).
However, in recent years, I feel the cinema experience has become so casualised that it's almost lost that exciting, special feeling.
In an environment of extreme levels of casualised teaching and crowded workloads of other academics and professional staff due to chronic underfunding, the opportunities provided by OLT to focus and fund innovation in higher education pedagogy and programs is critical to the ongoing success of our higher education system and the outcomes for our students