casuistry

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ca·su·ist·ry

 (kăzh′o͞o-ĭ-strē)
n. pl. ca·su·ist·ries
1. Specious or excessively subtle reasoning intended to rationalize or mislead.
2. The determination of right and wrong in questions of conduct or conscience by analyzing cases that illustrate general ethical rules.

[From casuist.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

casuistry

(ˈkæzjʊɪstrɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Philosophy) philosophy the resolution of particular moral dilemmas, esp those arising from conflicting general moral rules, by careful distinction of the cases to which these rules apply
2. reasoning that is specious, misleading, or oversubtle
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cas•u•ist•ry

(ˈkæʒ u ə stri)

n., pl. -ries.
1. oversubtle, fallacious, or dishonest reasoning; sophistry.
2. the application of general ethical principles to particular cases of conscience or conduct.
[1715–25]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

casuistry

1. the branch of ethics or theology that studies the relation of general ethical principles to particular cases of conduct or conscience.
2. a dishonest or oversubtle application of such principles.
See also: Ethics
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.casuistry - argumentation that is specious or excessively subtle and intended to be misleading
line of reasoning, logical argument, argumentation, argument, line - a course of reasoning aimed at demonstrating a truth or falsehood; the methodical process of logical reasoning; "I can't follow your line of reasoning"
2.casuistry - moral philosophy based on the application of general ethical principles to resolve moral dilemmas
moral philosophy, ethics - the philosophical study of moral values and rules
probabilism - a Roman Catholic system of casuistry that when expert opinions differ an actor can follow any solidly probable opinion that he wishes even though some different opinion might be more probable
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

casuistry

noun sophistry, chicanery, equivocation, speciousness, sophism Every system of moral rules, laws, and principles gives rise to casuistry.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

casuistry

noun
Plausible but invalid reasoning:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

casuistry

[ˈkæzjʊɪstrɪ] N (frm) → casuística f (pej) → sofismas mpl, razonamiento m falaz
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

casuistry

[ˈkæzjuɪstri] n (formal)casuistique f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

casuistry

nKasuistik f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Interestingly, to get a better idea of what was going on, we need to approach the casuistries of reason of state principally through their negative adumbration.
Casuistries engage in varying degrees of rhetorical manipulation, promoting changes in thinking, belief, and interpretation:
In order to survive over any period of time, a religion must develop and maintain rituals, narratives, origin-stories, cultic practices, casuistries and taboos, and figures and institutions of authority.