catalepsy


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Related to catalepsy: narcolepsy

cat·a·lep·sy

 (kăt′l-ĕp′sē)
n. pl. cat·a·lep·sies
A condition characterized by lack of response to external stimuli and by muscular rigidity, so that the limbs remain where they are positioned. It occurs in a variety of physical and psychological disorders, such as epilepsy and schizophrenia, and can be induced by hypnosis.

[Middle English catalempsi, from Late Latin catalēmpsia, from Greek katalēpsis, from katalambanein, to seize upon : kata-, intensive pref.; see cata- + lambanein, lēp-, to seize.]

cat′a·lep′tic (kăt′l-ĕp′tĭk) adj.
cat′a·lep′ti·cal·ly adv.

catalepsy

(ˈkætəˌlɛpsɪ)
n
(Psychiatry) a state of prolonged rigid posture, occurring for example in schizophrenia or in hypnotic trances
[C16: from Medieval Latin catalēpsia, variant of Late Latin catalēpsis, from Greek katalēpsis, literally: a seizing, from katalambanein to hold down, from kata- down + lambanein to grasp]
ˌcataˈleptic adj

cat•a•lep•sy

(ˈkæt lˌɛp si)

also cat`a•lep′sis,



n.
a seizure or abnormal condition characterized by postural rigidity and mental stupor, associated with certain brain disorders.
[1350–1400; Middle English cathalempsia < Medieval Latin catalēpsia, variant of Late Latin catalēpsis < Greek katálēpsis seizure < katalēb-, variant s. of katalambánein to seize]
cat`a•lep′tic, adj., n.

catalepsy

Pathology, Psychiatry. a physical condition characterized by a loss of sensation, muscular rigidity, flxity of posture, and often by a loss of contact with surroundings. Also catalepsis. — cataleptic, adj.
See also: Disease and Illness

catalepsy

A state of muscular rigidity maintained for long periods.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.catalepsy - a trancelike state with loss of voluntary motion and failure to react to stimuli
hypersomnia - an inability to stay awake
Translations
katalepsija

catalepsy

[ˈkætlepsɪ] Ncatalepsia f

catalepsy

nKatalepsie f, → Starrsucht f

cat·a·lep·sy

n. catalepsia, condición caracterizada por la pérdida de la capacidad de movimiento muscular voluntario y disminución acentuada de la habilidad de reaccionar a estímulos, gen. asociada con transtornos psicológicos.
References in classic literature ?
It can only have been the condition that is called catalepsy," said Challenger.
You may label it catalepsy," remarked Summerlee, "but, after all, that is only a name, and we know as little of the result as we do of the poison which has caused it.
After I had graduated I continued to devote myself to research, occupying a minor position in King's College Hospital, and I was fortunate enough to excite considerable interest by my research into the pathology of catalepsy, and finally to win the Bruce Pinkerton prize and medal by the monograph on nervous lesions to which your friend has just alluded.
This letter interest me deeply, because the chief difficulty in the study of catalepsy is the rareness of the disease.
He went in again, and put his right hand on the latch of the door to close it--but he did not close it: he was arrested, as he had been already since his loss, by the invisible wand of catalepsy, and stood like a graven image, with wide but sightless eyes, holding open his door, powerless to resist either the good or the evil that might enter there.
But the fact is, I fell into catalepsy, and it was considered by my best friends that I was either dead or should be; they accordingly embalmed me at once -- I presume you are aware of the chief principle of the embalming process?
au reported catalepsy might be the reason for Jimenez's condition.
Motor changes: Relaxation, weakness, flask-spastic paralysis, catalepsy, hyperkinesis, increase in muscle strength.
While no consistent pattern was demonstrated between stress and akinetic and cataleptic motor behaviors, a significant negative correlation was shown between poststress latencies for catalepsy and extracellular DA concentrations, with a similar trend identified for akinesia.
According to DSM-5 criteria, the clinical presentation is dominated by the presence of at least three of the following symptoms: stupor, catalepsy, waxy flexibility, mutism, negativism, posturing, mannerism, stereotypy, agitation not influenced by external stimuli, grimacing, echolalia, and echopraxia (4, 6).