cataphora

(redirected from cataphoric)
Also found in: Medical.
Related to cataphoric: exophoric, anaphoric

ca·taph·o·ra

 (kə-tăf′ər-ə)
n.
The use of a linguistic unit, such as a pronoun, to refer ahead to another unit, for example, the use of him to refer to John in the sentence Near him, John saw a snake.


cat′a·phor′ic (kăt′ə-fôr′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cataphora

(kəˈtæfərə)
n
(Grammar) grammar the use of a word such as a pronoun that has the same reference as a word used subsequently in the same discourse. Compare anaphora
[from cata- + Greek pherein to bear]
cataphoric adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ca•taph•o•ra

(kəˈtæf ər ə)

n.
the use of a word or phrase to refer to a following word or group of words, as the use of the phrase as follows. Compare anaphora (def. 1)
(cata- + (ana) phora]
cat•a•phor•ic (ˌkæt əˈfɔr ɪk, -ˈfɒr-) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
What these readers share with those who find the ending trite or distracting is that their sole search is a cataphoric one, concluding with the reading of the final sentence.
Previous studies observing differences between children and adults reported that there were no differences in anaphora resolution between the two groups regarding null anaphora in Italian, but differences were found in cataphoric expressions (Serratrice 2007).
singular and with the cataphoric deictic marker "[phrase
Processing differences for anaphoric and cataphoric pronouns: Implications for theories of discourse processing.
Likewise, the terms like cataphoric and anaphoric references included in the textbook of class 10 are beyond the comprehension of teachers.
This cataphoric reference nominates the moderators of Woman.ru, exercising censorship that participants observe on the forum, as the subjects of governance, who are as accountable to the technologies of control ("an inspection"/[phrase omitted], noun, singular, feminine, accusative case) and as liable to punishment ("will be put behind bars"/[phrase omitted], verb, future tense, plural) as the forums' participants, whose interactional conduct they regulate.
Accordingly, two types of semiotic interplay are identified: cataphoric deduction and anaphoric deduction.
The findings, which bring into question some common claims in the literature, such as the preference of these forms for postmodifier and cataphoric use, leave the reader intrigued: why use a classification of items into nine frequency-determined groups if no differences between these groups are subsequently discussed?
Endophoric uses of atra, atas (anaphoric, discourse-deictic, and cataphoric) nevertheless far outnumber the exophoric ones.