cataplexy

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Related to cataplectic: cataleptic

cat·a·plex·y

 (kăt′ə-plĕk′sē)
n. pl. cat·a·plex·ies
A sudden loss of muscle tone and strength, usually caused by an extreme emotional stimulus.

[From Greek kataplēxis, fixation (of the eyes), from kataplēssein, to astound, terrify : kata-, intensive pref.; see cata- + plēssein, plēk-, to strike; see plāk- in Indo-European roots.]

cat′a·plec′tic (-plĕk′tĭk) adj.

cataplexy

(ˈkætəˌplɛksɪ)
n
1. (Pathology) sudden temporary paralysis, brought on by severe shock
2. (Zoology) a state of complete absence of movement assumed by animals while shamming death
[C19: from Greek kataplēxis amazement, from kataplēssein to strike down (with amazement), confound, from kata- down + plēssein to strike]
ˌcataˈplectic adj

cataplexy

a temporary paralytic or hypnotic state, often brought on by strong emotion. — cataplectic, adj.
See also: Nerves
Translations

cat·a·plex·y

n. cataplejía, pérdida repentina del tono muscular causada por un estado emocional intenso.

cataplexy

n cataplexia
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References in periodicals archive ?
This management relies on different classes of drugs, among which are stimulants for the excessive daytime sleepiness such as modafinil and amphetamine-like drugs and antidepressants and sodium oxybate for the cataplectic symptoms (5).
Over the subsequent 2 years the frequency of acute daytime drowsiness and cataplectic episodes decreased somewhat, but his nighttime insomnia remained.
Generally, cataplectic spells occur months to years after the onset sleep attacks but occasionally cataplexy is the initial manifestation.
Brain scans of a cataplectic attack in progress is rare because attacks occur unpredictably.
Cataplectic attacks are sometimes limited to the facial muscles or to the arms or legs, resulting in dysarthria, facial flickering, jaw tremor, head or jaw drooping, dropping of objects, or unlocking of the knees.
Patients usually remain conscious while they are cataplectic.
The doctor said: "If Philip had a cataplectic attack in these circumstances, he would lose control of his arms and, in particular, he would lose control of his legs and wouldn't be able to brake.
Unlike orexin-deficient mice, which are narcoleptic and cataplectic, the new mice sleep and act normally.
Prior to his first cataplectic attack 12 years ago, Mr Degge worked for an American firm frequently flying back and forth across Europe.