catapult


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cat·a·pult

 (kăt′ə-pŭlt′, -po͝olt′)
n.
1. Any of various military machines used for hurling missiles, such as large stones or spears, in ancient and medieval times.
2. A mechanism for launching aircraft at a speed sufficient for flight, as from the deck of a carrier.
3. A slingshot.
v. cat·a·pult·ed, cat·a·pult·ing, cat·a·pults
v.tr.
1. To hurl or launch from a catapult.
2. To hurl or launch by means other than a catapult: The blast catapulted bricks across the street.
3. To bring suddenly into prominence: The film catapulted her into fame.
v.intr.
1. To be catapulted or hurled: The rider catapulted over the handlebars.
2. To jump or spring: She catapulted over the gate.

[French catapulte, from Old French, from Latin catapulta, from Greek katapaltēs : kata-, cata- + pallein, to brandish, poise a weapon before hurling; see pāl- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

catapult

(ˈkætəˌpʌlt)
n
1. a Y-shaped implement with a loop of elastic fastened to the ends of the two prongs, used mainly by children for shooting small stones, etc. US and Canadian name: slingshot
2. (Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) a heavy war engine used formerly for hurling stones, etc
3. (Military) a device installed in warships to launch aircraft
vb
4. (tr) to shoot forth from or as if from a catapult
5. (foll by: over, into, etc) to move precipitately: she was catapulted to stardom overnight.
[C16: from Latin catapulta, from Greek katapeltēs, from kata- down + pallein to hurl]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cat•a•pult

(ˈkæt əˌpʌlt, -ˌpʊlt)

n.
1. an ancient military engine for hurling stones, arrows, etc.
2. a device for launching an airplane from the deck of a ship.
v.t., v.i.
3. to hurl or be hurled from or as if from a catapult.
4. to move quickly, suddenly, or forcibly.
[1570–80; < Latin catapulta < Greek katapéltēs=kata- cata- + péltēs hurler, akin to pállein to hurl]
cat`a•pul′tic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

catapult

A structure which provides an auxiliary source of thrust to a missile or aircraft; must combine the functions of directing and accelerating the missile during its travel on the catapult; serves the same functions for a missile as does a gun tube for a shell.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.

catapult


Past participle: catapulted
Gerund: catapulting

Imperative
catapult
catapult
Present
I catapult
you catapult
he/she/it catapults
we catapult
you catapult
they catapult
Preterite
I catapulted
you catapulted
he/she/it catapulted
we catapulted
you catapulted
they catapulted
Present Continuous
I am catapulting
you are catapulting
he/she/it is catapulting
we are catapulting
you are catapulting
they are catapulting
Present Perfect
I have catapulted
you have catapulted
he/she/it has catapulted
we have catapulted
you have catapulted
they have catapulted
Past Continuous
I was catapulting
you were catapulting
he/she/it was catapulting
we were catapulting
you were catapulting
they were catapulting
Past Perfect
I had catapulted
you had catapulted
he/she/it had catapulted
we had catapulted
you had catapulted
they had catapulted
Future
I will catapult
you will catapult
he/she/it will catapult
we will catapult
you will catapult
they will catapult
Future Perfect
I will have catapulted
you will have catapulted
he/she/it will have catapulted
we will have catapulted
you will have catapulted
they will have catapulted
Future Continuous
I will be catapulting
you will be catapulting
he/she/it will be catapulting
we will be catapulting
you will be catapulting
they will be catapulting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been catapulting
you have been catapulting
he/she/it has been catapulting
we have been catapulting
you have been catapulting
they have been catapulting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been catapulting
you will have been catapulting
he/she/it will have been catapulting
we will have been catapulting
you will have been catapulting
they will have been catapulting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been catapulting
you had been catapulting
he/she/it had been catapulting
we had been catapulting
you had been catapulting
they had been catapulting
Conditional
I would catapult
you would catapult
he/she/it would catapult
we would catapult
you would catapult
they would catapult
Past Conditional
I would have catapulted
you would have catapulted
he/she/it would have catapulted
we would have catapulted
you would have catapulted
they would have catapulted
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011

catapult

slingshot
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.catapult - a plaything consisting of a Y-shaped stick with elastic between the armscatapult - a plaything consisting of a Y-shaped stick with elastic between the arms; used to propel small stones
plaything, toy - an artifact designed to be played with
2.catapult - a device that launches aircraft from a warship
device - an instrumentality invented for a particular purpose; "the device is small enough to wear on your wrist"; "a device intended to conserve water"
3.catapult - an engine that provided medieval artillery used during siegescatapult - an engine that provided medieval artillery used during sieges; a heavy war engine for hurling large stones and other missiles
engine - an instrument or machine that is used in warfare, such as a battering ram, catapult, artillery piece, etc.; "medieval engines of war"
Verb1.catapult - shoot forth or launch, as if from a catapult; "the enemy catapulted rocks towards the fort"
propel, impel - cause to move forward with force; "Steam propels this ship"
2.catapult - hurl as if with a sling
hurl, hurtle, cast - throw forcefully
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

catapult

noun
1. sling, slingshot (U.S.), trebuchet, ballista They were hit twice by missiles fired from a catapult.
verb
1. shoot, pitch, plunge, toss, hurl, propel, hurtle, heave He was catapulted into the side of the van.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
مَنْجَنيقيَقْذِفُ بِقُوَّه
katapultovatprakvystřelit
kyleslangebøsseslynge
להזניק
slöngva, kastateygjubyssa
išsviestitimpa
‘kaķene’katapultētšaut ar ‘kaķeni’
frača
hızla ve şiddetle fırlatmaksapan

catapult

[ˈkætəpʌlt]
A. N
1. (Brit) (= slingshot) → tirador m, tirachinas m inv
2. (Aer, Mil) → catapulta f
B. VT
1. (Aer) → catapultar
2. (fig) he was catapulted to famefue catapultado a la fama
C. VI (fig) his record catapulted to number onesu disco subió catapultado al número uno
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

catapult

[ˈkætəpʌlt]
n (= slingshot) → lance-pierres m inv, fronde m
(= siege engine) → catapulte f
vi (= rise quickly) → se catapulter
vt
(= throw) → projeter
to be catapulted into sth (by force, explosion)être projeté(e) dans qch
to catapult sb to stardom → propulser qn au rang de célébrité
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

catapult

n (Brit: = slingshot) → Schleuder f; (Mil, Aviat) → Katapult nt or m; catapult launching (Aviat) → Katapultstart m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

catapult

[ˈkætəˌpʌlt]
1. n (slingshot) → fionda (Mil, Aer) → catapulta
2. vtcatapultare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

catapult

(ˈkӕtəpalt) noun
(American ˈslingshot) a small forked stick with an elastic string fixed to the two prongs for firing small stones etc, usually used by children.
verb
to throw violently. The driver was catapulted through the windscreen when his car hit the wall.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
He recalled Old Beatson in the past - that merry and affectionate lad - and their joint adventures and mishaps, the window they had broken with a catapult in India Place, the escalade of the castle rock, and many another inestimable bond of friendship; and his hurt surprise grew deeper.
At length, obliged to beat a retreat before superior numbers, they formed an intrenchment behind the large table, which they raised by main force; whilst the two others, arming themselves each with a trestle, and using it like a great sledge-hammer, knocked down at a blow eight sailors upon whose heads they had brought their monstrous catapult in play.
Like an arrow from a catapult he approaches the hippodrome!
At the threshold he paused for an instant, and, lifting the struggling Arab above his head, hurled him, as though from a catapult, full in the faces of his on-pressing fellows.
The contents of the boy's pockets naturally made a larger heap, and included marbles, a ball of string, an electric torch, a magnet, a small catapult, and, of course, a large pocketknife, almost to be described as a small tool box, a complex apparatus on which he seemed disposed to linger, pointing out that it included a pair of nippers, a tool for punching holes in wood, and, above all, an instrument for taking stones out of a horse's hoof.
At the column's head rode Norman of Torn and the little grim, gray, old man; and behind them nine companies of knights, followed by the catapult detachment; then came the sumpter beasts.
Under his tumbled sandy hair his head seemed as hard and powerful as a catapult, and his shoulders looked strong enough in themselves to support a span of any one of his ten great bridges that cut the air above as many rivers.
The throng of pirates had cleared away from the great wooden catapult, leaving two of their number to discharge it.
It was only a shove, a flirt of the wrist, yet so tremendous was his strength that I was hurled backward as from a catapult. I struck the door of the state-room which had formerly been Mugridge's, splintering and smashing the panels with the impact of my body.
Readjusting the battery, we now applied the fluid to the bisected nerves -- when, with a movement of exceeding life-likeness, the Mummy first drew up its right knee so as to bring it nearly in contact with the abdomen, and then, straightening the limb with inconceivable force, bestowed a kick upon Doctor Ponnonner, which had the effect of discharging that gentleman, like an arrow from a catapult, through a window into the street below.
I kill!" and again Tarzan met him with a sudden hold that the stupid bull, being ignorant of, could not possibly avert--a hold and a throw that brought a scream of delight from the interested audience and suddenly filled the girl with doubts as to the man's madness--evidently he was quite safe among the apes, for she saw him swing Go-lat to his back and then catapult him over his shoulder.
In a corner below the mangle, on a couple of stools, sat two very little children: a boy and a girl; and when the very long boy, in an interval of staring, took a turn at the mangle, it was alarming to see how it lunged itself at those two innocents, like a catapult designed for their destruction, harmlessly retiring when within an inch of their heads.