catapult

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cat·a·pult

 (kăt′ə-pŭlt′, -po͝olt′)
n.
1. Any of various military machines used for hurling missiles, such as large stones or spears, in ancient and medieval times.
2. A mechanism for launching aircraft at a speed sufficient for flight, as from the deck of a carrier.
3. A slingshot.
v. cat·a·pult·ed, cat·a·pult·ing, cat·a·pults
v.tr.
1. To hurl or launch from a catapult.
2. To hurl or launch by means other than a catapult: The blast catapulted bricks across the street.
3. To bring suddenly into prominence: The film catapulted her into fame.
v.intr.
1. To be catapulted or hurled: The rider catapulted over the handlebars.
2. To jump or spring: She catapulted over the gate.

[French catapulte, from Old French, from Latin catapulta, from Greek katapaltēs : kata-, cata- + pallein, to brandish, poise a weapon before hurling; see pāl- in Indo-European roots.]

catapult

(ˈkætəˌpʌlt)
n
1. a Y-shaped implement with a loop of elastic fastened to the ends of the two prongs, used mainly by children for shooting small stones, etc. US and Canadian name: slingshot
2. (Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) a heavy war engine used formerly for hurling stones, etc
3. (Military) a device installed in warships to launch aircraft
vb
4. (tr) to shoot forth from or as if from a catapult
5. (foll by: over, into, etc) to move precipitately: she was catapulted to stardom overnight.
[C16: from Latin catapulta, from Greek katapeltēs, from kata- down + pallein to hurl]

cat•a•pult

(ˈkæt əˌpʌlt, -ˌpʊlt)

n.
1. an ancient military engine for hurling stones, arrows, etc.
2. a device for launching an airplane from the deck of a ship.
v.t., v.i.
3. to hurl or be hurled from or as if from a catapult.
4. to move quickly, suddenly, or forcibly.
[1570–80; < Latin catapulta < Greek katapéltēs=kata- cata- + péltēs hurler, akin to pállein to hurl]
cat`a•pul′tic, adj.

catapult

A structure which provides an auxiliary source of thrust to a missile or aircraft; must combine the functions of directing and accelerating the missile during its travel on the catapult; serves the same functions for a missile as does a gun tube for a shell.

catapult


Past participle: catapulted
Gerund: catapulting

Imperative
catapult
catapult
Present
I catapult
you catapult
he/she/it catapults
we catapult
you catapult
they catapult
Preterite
I catapulted
you catapulted
he/she/it catapulted
we catapulted
you catapulted
they catapulted
Present Continuous
I am catapulting
you are catapulting
he/she/it is catapulting
we are catapulting
you are catapulting
they are catapulting
Present Perfect
I have catapulted
you have catapulted
he/she/it has catapulted
we have catapulted
you have catapulted
they have catapulted
Past Continuous
I was catapulting
you were catapulting
he/she/it was catapulting
we were catapulting
you were catapulting
they were catapulting
Past Perfect
I had catapulted
you had catapulted
he/she/it had catapulted
we had catapulted
you had catapulted
they had catapulted
Future
I will catapult
you will catapult
he/she/it will catapult
we will catapult
you will catapult
they will catapult
Future Perfect
I will have catapulted
you will have catapulted
he/she/it will have catapulted
we will have catapulted
you will have catapulted
they will have catapulted
Future Continuous
I will be catapulting
you will be catapulting
he/she/it will be catapulting
we will be catapulting
you will be catapulting
they will be catapulting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been catapulting
you have been catapulting
he/she/it has been catapulting
we have been catapulting
you have been catapulting
they have been catapulting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been catapulting
you will have been catapulting
he/she/it will have been catapulting
we will have been catapulting
you will have been catapulting
they will have been catapulting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been catapulting
you had been catapulting
he/she/it had been catapulting
we had been catapulting
you had been catapulting
they had been catapulting
Conditional
I would catapult
you would catapult
he/she/it would catapult
we would catapult
you would catapult
they would catapult
Past Conditional
I would have catapulted
you would have catapulted
he/she/it would have catapulted
we would have catapulted
you would have catapulted
they would have catapulted

catapult

slingshot
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.catapult - a plaything consisting of a Y-shaped stick with elastic between the armscatapult - a plaything consisting of a Y-shaped stick with elastic between the arms; used to propel small stones
plaything, toy - an artifact designed to be played with
2.catapult - a device that launches aircraft from a warship
device - an instrumentality invented for a particular purpose; "the device is small enough to wear on your wrist"; "a device intended to conserve water"
3.catapult - an engine that provided medieval artillery used during siegescatapult - an engine that provided medieval artillery used during sieges; a heavy war engine for hurling large stones and other missiles
engine - an instrument or machine that is used in warfare, such as a battering ram, catapult, artillery piece, etc.; "medieval engines of war"
Verb1.catapult - shoot forth or launch, as if from a catapult; "the enemy catapulted rocks towards the fort"
propel, impel - cause to move forward with force; "Steam propels this ship"
2.catapult - hurl as if with a sling
hurl, hurtle, cast - throw forcefully

catapult

noun
1. sling, slingshot (U.S.), trebuchet, ballista They were hit twice by missiles fired from a catapult.
verb
1. shoot, pitch, plunge, toss, hurl, propel, hurtle, heave He was catapulted into the side of the van.
Translations
مَنْجَنيقيَقْذِفُ بِقُوَّه
katapultovatprakvystřelit
kyleslangebøsseslynge
להזניק
slöngva, kastateygjubyssa
išsviestitimpa
‘kaķene’katapultētšaut ar ‘kaķeni’
frača
hızla ve şiddetle fırlatmaksapan

catapult

[ˈkætəpʌlt]
A. N
1. (Brit) (= slingshot) → tirador m, tirachinas m inv
2. (Aer, Mil) → catapulta f
B. VT
1. (Aer) → catapultar
2. (fig) he was catapulted to famefue catapultado a la fama
C. VI (fig) his record catapulted to number onesu disco subió catapultado al número uno

catapult

[ˈkætəpʌlt]
n (= slingshot) → lance-pierres m inv, fronde m
(= siege engine) → catapulte f
vi (= rise quickly) → se catapulter
vt
(= throw) → projeter
to be catapulted into sth (by force, explosion)être projeté(e) dans qch
to catapult sb to stardom → propulser qn au rang de célébrité

catapult

n (Brit: = slingshot) → Schleuder f; (Mil, Aviat) → Katapult nt or m; catapult launching (Aviat) → Katapultstart m

catapult

[ˈkætəˌpʌlt]
1. n (slingshot) → fionda (Mil, Aer) → catapulta
2. vtcatapultare

catapult

(ˈkӕtəpalt) noun
(American ˈslingshot) a small forked stick with an elastic string fixed to the two prongs for firing small stones etc, usually used by children.
verb
to throw violently. The driver was catapulted through the windscreen when his car hit the wall.