catasta

catasta

(kəˈtæstə)
n
the platform on which slaves were formerly presented to be sold at markets
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References in periodicals archive ?
(20.) Simpson EE, Maylor EA, Rae G, Meunier N, Andriollo-Sanchez M, Catasta G, et al.
the sun, Con la faccia alla sconfitta the herd churned the dead water La catasta di legna cruda accanto, of the cursed mud-puddles!
Co-Founder Caroline Catasta said, "Being 181 cm (5'11") myself and wearing a shoe size 42,5 (11.5) I was struggling my whole life finding clothes and shoes that would fit.
[15] Oren, E., Delbru, R., Catasta, M., Cyganiak, R., Stenzhorn, H., Tummarello, G.
(23.) Intorre F, Maiani G, Cuzzolaro M, Simpson EE, Catasta G, Ciarapica D, Mauro B, Toti E, Zaccaria M, Coudray C, Corelli S, Palomba L, Polito A.
A rarissimi intervalli tuttavia dalla catasta di macerie un flebile colpo partiva.
His Catasta (Pile), 1967, a stack of Eternit tubes, for example, could be read as a response to the neatly contoured plastic stacking chairs designed by Marco Zanuso and Richard Sapper in the early 1960s.
Dramatic Texts and Records, #891, suggests (with a query mark) that the maidens were suspended in a cage ("in quadam catasta"); but the word "catasta" normally ("catesta") meant a platform or scaffold.