catch up with


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Related to catch up with: catch up with someone

catch

 (kăch, kĕch)
v. caught (kôt), catch·ing, catch·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To get and hold (something that has been in motion) in a hand, the hands, a container, or an implement: caught the ball in the web of the lacrosse stick.
b. To take hold of, especially forcibly or suddenly; grasp: caught me by the arm; caught the reins.
c. To stop (oneself) from doing an action: I caught myself before replying.
2.
a. To capture or seize, especially after a chase: The police caught the robber in the next town.
b. To capture or take by trapping, snaring, or some other means: I caught three fish with that lure.
c. To take in and hold or contain: a pond that catches runoff.
3.
a. To discover or come upon suddenly, unexpectedly, or accidentally: He was caught in the act of stealing.
b. To become cognizant or aware of suddenly: caught her gazing out the window.
4.
a. To reach just in time; get so as to be carried by: caught the bus to town; catch a wave.
b. To overtake: The driver of the green car caught the leader on the straightaway.
5.
a. To cause to become hooked, entangled, or fastened: caught my hem on the stair.
b. To hold up; delay: was caught in traffic for an hour.
6.
a. To make contact with; strike: The boxer caught his opponent with a left hook.
b. To propel an object so that it hits (something): The center caught the back of the net with a hard shot.
7.
a. To become subject to or to contract, as by exposure to a pathogen: catch a cold.
b. To become affected by or infused with: caught the joyous mood of the festival.
c. To suffer from the receipt of (criticism, for example): caught hell for being late.
8.
a. To perceive suddenly or momentarily: We caught a glimpse of the movie star. I caught a whiff of her perfume.
b. To hear or listen to: caught the news bulletin on the radio; didn't catch the end of your sentence
c. To grasp mentally; apprehend: I don't catch your meaning.
9.
a. To go to see (a performance, for example): caught the midnight show.
b. To get (something required), usually quickly or for a brief period: catch some sleep.
10.
a. To attract and fix; arrest: couldn't catch their attention; caught the teacher's eye.
b. To reproduce or represent effectively: an impressionist who caught the effects of wind and water in his paintings.
11. To deceive: failed to be caught by their fraudulent schemes.
12. Baseball To play (a game) as catcher.
v.intr.
1. To become held, entangled, or fastened: My coat caught in the car door.
2. To act or move so as to hold or grab someone or something: tried to catch at the life preserver.
3. To be communicable or infectious; spread.
4. To become ignited: The fire caught.
5. Baseball To act as catcher.
n.
1.
a. The act of catching, especially the grabbing and holding of a thrown, kicked, or batted ball before it hits the ground.
b. A game of throwing and catching a ball.
2.
a. A quantity that is caught: The catch amounted to 50 fish.
b. Something that is perceived or noticed: The mistake you found was a good catch.
c. Informal A person considered to be an attractive or admirable romantic partner.
3. A tricky or previously unsuspected condition or drawback: It sounds like a good offer, but there may be a catch.
4. A device for fastening something or for checking motion: The car's hood has a safety catch.
5. A choking or stoppage of the breath or voice: a catch in his voice.
6. A snatch; a fragment: could only hear catches of the song.
7. Music A canonic, often rhythmically intricate composition for three or more voices, popular especially in the 17th and 18th centuries.
Phrasal Verbs:
catch on
1. To understand something: These students catch on quickly.
2. To become popular: Skateboarding caught on quickly.
catch out
To detect (another) in wrongdoing or error.
catch up
1. To move fast enough to attain the same progress as another; draw even: caught up to the leader on the last lap of the race.
2. To become equal or on a par with another: finally caught up with his brother in height.
3. To bring an activity to completion or to a state of currentness: catch up on correspondence.
4. To bring (another) up to date; brief: Let me catch you up on all the gossip.
5. To seize or lift suddenly: The wind caught up the umbrella and carried it off.
6. To involve, often unwillingly: was caught up in the scandal.
7. To captivate; enthrall: I was caught up in the mood of the evening.
Idioms:
catch fire
1. To ignite.
2. To become very enthusiastic.
3. To become the subject of great interest and widespread enthusiasm: an idea that caught fire all over the country.
catch it Informal
To receive a punishment or scolding.
catch (one's) breath
To rest so as to be able to continue an activity.
catch (one's) death
To catch a cold or other illness.
catch up with
1. To find or arrest after a period of pursuit: The police finally caught up with him in Omaha.
2. To have unpleasant consequences for, especially after a period of quiescence: mistakes that caught up with him when he ran for president.
catch you later
Informal Used to express good-bye.

[Middle English cacchen, from Old North French cachier, to chase, from Vulgar Latin *captiāre; see chase1.]

catch′a·ble adj.
Synonyms: catch, enmesh, ensnare, entangle, entrap, snare1, trap1
These verbs mean to take in and hold as if by using bait or a lure: caught in a web of lies; enmeshed in the dispute; ensnared an unsuspecting customer; became entangled in her own contradictions; entrapped by a convincing undercover agent; snared by false hopes; trapped into incriminating himself.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.catch up with - catch up with and possibly overtake; "The Rolls Royce caught us near the exit ramp"
catch - reach in time; "I have to catch a train at 7 o'clock"
2.catch up with - make up work that was missed due to absence at a later point; "I have to make up a French exam"; "Can I catch up with the material or is it too late?"
recuperate, recoup, recover - regain or make up for; "recuperate one's losses"
References in periodicals archive ?
15am: Time for a quick catch up with Kevin Davidson, the workshop manager, to see what's booked in for the day.
If you want to find a competitor that might be able to match up to us, it is Deutsche Poste, but they probably have several years of work to do to catch up with us.
Looking ahead at the commercial real estate market, get ready for even more dramatic spikes in rental rates, continued tightening of the market and decreasing vacancy rates, and the emergence of new types of non-traditional property developers, as supply attempts to catch up with market demand.