catchy

(redirected from catchier)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

catch·y

 (kăch′ē, kĕch′ē)
adj. catch·i·er, catch·i·est
1. Attractive or appealing: a catchy idea for a new television series.
2. Easily remembered: a song with a catchy tune.
3. Tricky; deceptive: a catchy question on an exam.
4. Fitful or spasmodic: catchy breathing.

catch′i·ness n.

catchy

(ˈkætʃɪ)
adj, catchier or catchiest
1. (of a tune, etc) pleasant and easily remembered or imitated
2. tricky or deceptive: a catchy question.
3. irregular: a catchy breeze.
ˈcatchiness n

catch•y

(ˈkætʃ i)

adj. catch•i•er, catch•i•est.
1. pleasing and easily remembered: a catchy tune.
2. likely to attract interest or attention: a catchy title.
3. tricky; deceptive: a catchy question.
4. occurring in snatches; fitful: a catchy wind.
[1795–1805]
catch′i•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.catchy - having concealed difficultycatchy - having concealed difficulty; "a catchy question"; "a tricky recipe to follow"
difficult, hard - not easy; requiring great physical or mental effort to accomplish or comprehend or endure; "a difficult task"; "nesting places on the cliffs are difficult of access"; "difficult times"; "why is it so hard for you to keep a secret?"
2.catchy - likely to attract attention; "a catchy title for a movie"
appealing - able to attract interest or draw favorable attention; "He added an appealing and memorable figure to popular American mythology"- Vincent Starrett; "an appealing sense of humor"; "the idea of having enough money to retire at fifty is very appealing"

catchy

adjective memorable, haunting, unforgettable, captivating a catchy theme song
Translations
جَذّابٌ وَسَهْلُ الحِفْظ
poutavýpůsobivý
iørefaldende
fülbemászó
grípandi
akılda kalırkolayca hatırlanan

catchy

[ˈkætʃɪ] ADJ (catchier (compar) (catchiest (superl))) [tune, slogan] → pegadizo; [name, title] → fácil de recordar, con gancho

catchy

[ˈkætʃi] adj [tune, song] → entraînant(e)

catchy

adj (+er) tune, sloganeingängig; titleeinprägsam

catchy

[ˈkætʃɪ] adj (tune) → orecchiabile

catch

(kӕtʃ) past tense past participle caught (koːt) verb
1. to stop and hold (something which is moving); to capture. He caught the cricket ball; The cat caught a mouse; Did you catch any fish?; I tried to catch his attention.
2. to be in time for, or get on (a train, bus etc). I'll have to catch the 9.45 (train) to London.
3. to surprise (someone) in the act of. I caught him stealing (my vegetables).
4. to become infected with (a disease or illness). He caught flu.
5. to (cause to) become accidentally attached or held. The child caught her fingers in the car door.
6. to hit. The punch caught him on the chin.
7. to manage to hear. Did you catch what she said?
8. to start burning. I dropped a match on the pile of wood and it caught (fire) immediately.
noun
1. an act of catching. He took a fine catch behind the wicket.
2. a small device for holding (a door etc) in place. The catch on my suitcase is broken.
3. the total amount (of eg fish) caught. the largest catch of mackerel this year.
4. a trick or problem. There's a catch in this question.
ˈcatching adjective
infectious. Is chicken-pox catching?
ˈcatchy adjective
(of a tune) attractive and easily remembered.
ˈcatch-phrase, ˈcatch-word nouns
a phrase or word in popular use for a time.
catch someone's eye
to attract someone's attention. The advertisement caught my eye; I couldn't catch the waiter's eye and so we were last to be served.
catch on
1. to become popular. The fashion caught on.
2. to understand. He's a bit slow to catch on.
catch out
1. to put out (a batsman) at cricket by catching the ball after it has been hit and before it touches the ground.
2. to cause (someone) to fail by means of a trick, a difficult question etc. The last question in the exam caught them all out.
catch up
to come level (with). We caught him up at the corner; Ask the taxi-driver if he can catch up with that lorry; We waited for him to catch up; She had a lot of schoolwork to catch up on after her illness.
References in periodicals archive ?
While the EU could have done itself a favour by giving catchier titles to its programmes, spending under this and some associated headings has delivered many benefits to Scotland in general and to more disadvantaged areas - not least the Highlands and islands.
Known as operatic pop (and sometimes as the far catchier popera), this is a subgenre of pop music performed in an operatic singing style, or a song, theme or motif from classical music stylised as pop which sprang from the Tin Pan Alley musicians of the early 1900s.
Pronounced "eh-lok," it is a shorter, catchier form of "Eloquent," defined by the Oxford English Dictionary as "giving a clear, strong message." It emphasizes EloQ's goal of using superior communication skills and local market literacy to represent their clients in a way that is both faithful to their branding and fluent in the local style.
The melodies are catchier than you might expect from somebody who describes himself as a punk poet, but it's lyrically that the album stands out, each track acting as a witty, ironic short story about life on the fringes of society.
There was nothing in his recent near-miss at Pontefract to suggest he is anything other than cherry ripe for the first running of the Celebrating Pipers Note Handicap - a rather catchier title than the Visit attheraces.com/punchestown Handicap, which is what it was when he won it in 2015.
THE international protest group Extinction Rebellion could have had a catchier name but it is, after all, campaigning to save the planet.
HBO Asia CEO Jonathan Spink, however, suggested the catchier 'Food Lore,' inspired by the success and name recall of 'Folklore.' Khoo's episode will center on 'high-end and cheap cuisine.'
"She became HRH The Princess of Wales when she married Charles, but 'Princess Diana' was deemed far catchier," she said.
From there, they can customize marketing tools that are catchier and easier to retain.
After the death of Edward VII it became illegal to use the Royal name so Bell took the first two letters of each word to make the catchier Be-Ro.
A historically low unemployment rate, coupled with projections for record-breaking holiday sales, means retailers, from major chains to small businesses, are being forced to offer higher pay and catchier perks to woo temporary holiday workers.