catchy

(redirected from catchier)
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catch·y

 (kăch′ē, kĕch′ē)
adj. catch·i·er, catch·i·est
1. Attractive or appealing: a catchy idea for a new television series.
2. Easily remembered: a song with a catchy tune.
3. Tricky; deceptive: a catchy question on an exam.
4. Fitful or spasmodic: catchy breathing.

catch′i·ness n.

catchy

(ˈkætʃɪ)
adj, catchier or catchiest
1. (of a tune, etc) pleasant and easily remembered or imitated
2. tricky or deceptive: a catchy question.
3. irregular: a catchy breeze.
ˈcatchiness n

catch•y

(ˈkætʃ i)

adj. catch•i•er, catch•i•est.
1. pleasing and easily remembered: a catchy tune.
2. likely to attract interest or attention: a catchy title.
3. tricky; deceptive: a catchy question.
4. occurring in snatches; fitful: a catchy wind.
[1795–1805]
catch′i•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.catchy - having concealed difficultycatchy - having concealed difficulty; "a catchy question"; "a tricky recipe to follow"
difficult, hard - not easy; requiring great physical or mental effort to accomplish or comprehend or endure; "a difficult task"; "nesting places on the cliffs are difficult of access"; "difficult times"; "why is it so hard for you to keep a secret?"
2.catchy - likely to attract attention; "a catchy title for a movie"
appealing - able to attract interest or draw favorable attention; "He added an appealing and memorable figure to popular American mythology"- Vincent Starrett; "an appealing sense of humor"; "the idea of having enough money to retire at fifty is very appealing"

catchy

adjective memorable, haunting, unforgettable, captivating a catchy theme song
Translations
جَذّابٌ وَسَهْلُ الحِفْظ
poutavýpůsobivý
iørefaldende
fülbemászó
grípandi
akılda kalırkolayca hatırlanan

catchy

[ˈkætʃɪ] ADJ (catchier (compar) (catchiest (superl))) [tune, slogan] → pegadizo; [name, title] → fácil de recordar, con gancho

catchy

[ˈkætʃi] adj [tune, song] → entraînant(e)

catchy

adj (+er) tune, sloganeingängig; titleeinprägsam

catchy

[ˈkætʃɪ] adj (tune) → orecchiabile

catch

(kӕtʃ) past tense past participle caught (koːt) verb
1. to stop and hold (something which is moving); to capture. He caught the cricket ball; The cat caught a mouse; Did you catch any fish?; I tried to catch his attention.
2. to be in time for, or get on (a train, bus etc). I'll have to catch the 9.45 (train) to London.
3. to surprise (someone) in the act of. I caught him stealing (my vegetables).
4. to become infected with (a disease or illness). He caught flu.
5. to (cause to) become accidentally attached or held. The child caught her fingers in the car door.
6. to hit. The punch caught him on the chin.
7. to manage to hear. Did you catch what she said?
8. to start burning. I dropped a match on the pile of wood and it caught (fire) immediately.
noun
1. an act of catching. He took a fine catch behind the wicket.
2. a small device for holding (a door etc) in place. The catch on my suitcase is broken.
3. the total amount (of eg fish) caught. the largest catch of mackerel this year.
4. a trick or problem. There's a catch in this question.
ˈcatching adjective
infectious. Is chicken-pox catching?
ˈcatchy adjective
(of a tune) attractive and easily remembered.
ˈcatch-phrase, ˈcatch-word nouns
a phrase or word in popular use for a time.
catch someone's eye
to attract someone's attention. The advertisement caught my eye; I couldn't catch the waiter's eye and so we were last to be served.
catch on
1. to become popular. The fashion caught on.
2. to understand. He's a bit slow to catch on.
catch out
1. to put out (a batsman) at cricket by catching the ball after it has been hit and before it touches the ground.
2. to cause (someone) to fail by means of a trick, a difficult question etc. The last question in the exam caught them all out.
catch up
to come level (with). We caught him up at the corner; Ask the taxi-driver if he can catch up with that lorry; We waited for him to catch up; She had a lot of schoolwork to catch up on after her illness.
References in periodicals archive ?
The name's a bit of a tongue twister so marketing people may need to come up with a catchier nickname should the self-healing screen become commercially available.
After all, Storm Aileen is catchier than an 'extratropical storm with sustained winds between 34-48 knots'.
Trump later adopted a catchier slogan, "Make America Great Again," but it retained the nativist overtones and racial dog whistles of the first.
Two of the catchier rule changes were the inclusion of a single-engine boat division, and adjusting the scoring for the two-day fishing event.
The Mirror Trap - Simulations Dundee five-piece rock'n'roll band The Mirror Trap's great new album hits you with the rampant Under The Glass Towers, and gets catchier with New Trance and other songs that are bound to win them new fans.
Leaf (2012-) Well, it was catchier than "Leading Environmentally-friendly Affordable Family car.
Due to its peculiar appearance, the planet-forming disk, which goes by the unwieldy name of 2MASS J16281370-2431391, has earned a catchier nickname - the "Flying Saucer.
But in America, entertainment is king, and Americans tend to focus on excitement above all -- who looks better, has a catchier sound bite, seems most "authentic", and so on, often to the point of absurdity.
Among the catchier tunes (Go Down Rockin', That's Rock And Roll) and rocky efforts (Thunderbolt), there are a couple of moody ballads.
Still, O'Neil said the film could have used a catchier title.
Even when they are able to perform their numbers clearly, the staging and choreography often feels too 'strict' to work alongside the catchier numbers, including Copa Girl and Man Wanted.
Get heavier, get softer, get catchier, get weirder.