catchy

(redirected from catchily)
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catch·y

 (kăch′ē, kĕch′ē)
adj. catch·i·er, catch·i·est
1. Attractive or appealing: a catchy idea for a new television series.
2. Easily remembered: a song with a catchy tune.
3. Tricky; deceptive: a catchy question on an exam.
4. Fitful or spasmodic: catchy breathing.

catch′i·ness n.

catchy

(ˈkætʃɪ)
adj, catchier or catchiest
1. (of a tune, etc) pleasant and easily remembered or imitated
2. tricky or deceptive: a catchy question.
3. irregular: a catchy breeze.
ˈcatchiness n

catch•y

(ˈkætʃ i)

adj. catch•i•er, catch•i•est.
1. pleasing and easily remembered: a catchy tune.
2. likely to attract interest or attention: a catchy title.
3. tricky; deceptive: a catchy question.
4. occurring in snatches; fitful: a catchy wind.
[1795–1805]
catch′i•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.catchy - having concealed difficultycatchy - having concealed difficulty; "a catchy question"; "a tricky recipe to follow"
difficult, hard - not easy; requiring great physical or mental effort to accomplish or comprehend or endure; "a difficult task"; "nesting places on the cliffs are difficult of access"; "difficult times"; "why is it so hard for you to keep a secret?"
2.catchy - likely to attract attention; "a catchy title for a movie"
appealing - able to attract interest or draw favorable attention; "He added an appealing and memorable figure to popular American mythology"- Vincent Starrett; "an appealing sense of humor"; "the idea of having enough money to retire at fifty is very appealing"

catchy

adjective memorable, haunting, unforgettable, captivating a catchy theme song
Translations
جَذّابٌ وَسَهْلُ الحِفْظ
poutavýpůsobivý
iørefaldende
fülbemászó
grípandi
akılda kalırkolayca hatırlanan

catchy

[ˈkætʃɪ] ADJ (catchier (compar) (catchiest (superl))) [tune, slogan] → pegadizo; [name, title] → fácil de recordar, con gancho

catchy

[ˈkætʃi] adj [tune, song] → entraînant(e)

catchy

adj (+er) tune, sloganeingängig; titleeinprägsam

catchy

[ˈkætʃɪ] adj (tune) → orecchiabile

catch

(kӕtʃ) past tense past participle caught (koːt) verb
1. to stop and hold (something which is moving); to capture. He caught the cricket ball; The cat caught a mouse; Did you catch any fish?; I tried to catch his attention.
2. to be in time for, or get on (a train, bus etc). I'll have to catch the 9.45 (train) to London.
3. to surprise (someone) in the act of. I caught him stealing (my vegetables).
4. to become infected with (a disease or illness). He caught flu.
5. to (cause to) become accidentally attached or held. The child caught her fingers in the car door.
6. to hit. The punch caught him on the chin.
7. to manage to hear. Did you catch what she said?
8. to start burning. I dropped a match on the pile of wood and it caught (fire) immediately.
noun
1. an act of catching. He took a fine catch behind the wicket.
2. a small device for holding (a door etc) in place. The catch on my suitcase is broken.
3. the total amount (of eg fish) caught. the largest catch of mackerel this year.
4. a trick or problem. There's a catch in this question.
ˈcatching adjective
infectious. Is chicken-pox catching?
ˈcatchy adjective
(of a tune) attractive and easily remembered.
ˈcatch-phrase, ˈcatch-word nouns
a phrase or word in popular use for a time.
catch someone's eye
to attract someone's attention. The advertisement caught my eye; I couldn't catch the waiter's eye and so we were last to be served.
catch on
1. to become popular. The fashion caught on.
2. to understand. He's a bit slow to catch on.
catch out
1. to put out (a batsman) at cricket by catching the ball after it has been hit and before it touches the ground.
2. to cause (someone) to fail by means of a trick, a difficult question etc. The last question in the exam caught them all out.
catch up
to come level (with). We caught him up at the corner; Ask the taxi-driver if he can catch up with that lorry; We waited for him to catch up; She had a lot of schoolwork to catch up on after her illness.
References in periodicals archive ?
So we were more than happy to relax in our booth for a while before the deep fried soft cream balls soaked in sugar or gulab jamun, as they are more catchily titled, were served.
This planet, which is catchily named HD 189733b, has winds that top 5,400mph.
But as soon as you step foot out of Mauritius' catchily named Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam Airport and into a cab, looking through the windows at the palm trees you straight away get that impression.
The catchily titled M3LL155X - or "Melissa", which represents her "personal female energy" - comes with a 16-minute video she selfdirected.
It's full of slightly brash but sporadically brilliant electro pop which veers from the ever-so-slightly controversial (Like 'em young) to the catchily defiant (Not On Drugs) and is as good as you would expect from the writer of one of this year's best singles so far, Ellie Goulding's Love Me Like You Do.
And the quest for the catchily titled Protected Geographical Indicator status began in earnest yesterday at Goodfellow & Steven bakers, when the national consultation that begins the process was launched.
But the set piece numbers and sequences come across so catchily and refreshingly because they have clearly been vigorously rehearsed and perfected.
As Makonnen puts it--and he's no stranger to a catchily uncommon delivery--"It's not about being marketable anymore.
The ability to handle large numbers of arrivals is also important to business travel and the catchily named meetings, incentives, conventions and exhibitions (Mice) sector.
First there's Dave's new gang of terror busters, the catchily named TERFOR.
This hilarious, foot-stomping verse, storybook and song are catchily realized with the quirky, dark comical illustrations and rhymes.
Fleetsolve's fuels - "end of waste products", as they are catchily called by the Environment Agency - include waste oils from manufacturers and the pharmaceutical industry, which Fleetsolve processes.