catechist


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Related to catechist: catechesis, catechism, Catechetics

cat·e·chist

 (kăt′ĭ-kĭst)
n.
A person who catechizes, especially one who instructs catechumens in preparation for admission into a Christian church.

[French catechiste, from Old French, from Late Latin catēchista, from Late Greek katēkhistēs, from katēkhizein, to teach by word of mouth; see catechize.]

cat′e·chis′tic, cat′e·chis′ti·cal adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cat•e•chist

(ˈkæt ɪ kɪst)

n.
1. a person who catechizes.
2. a person appointed to instruct catechumens.
[1555–65; < Late Latin < Greek]
cat`e•chis′tic, cat`e•chis′ti•cal, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.catechist - one who instructs catechumens in preparation for baptism (especially one using a catechism)
instructor, teacher - a person whose occupation is teaching
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

catechist

[ˈkætɪkɪst] Ncatequista mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
He was quite blind, and told me he was a catechist, which should have put me at my ease.
I had so plainly the upper-hand that my spirits rose, and indeed I took a pleasure in this game of blindman's buff; but the catechist grew angrier and angrier, and at last began to swear in Gaelic and to strike for my legs with his staff.
When I told him of my catechist, he shook his head, and said I was lucky to have got clear off.
"The cream of it is," says I, "that he called himself a catechist."
"My brave wife," returned Defarge, standing before her with his head a little bent, and his hands clasped at his back, like a docile and attentive pupil before his catechist, "I do not question all this.
Viskupi told a chaplain that "this kind of segregation is unacceptable" and that he would be glad if the chaplain agreed with the girl sitting with her peers."He agreed in the end, and he informed the catechist teacher who was with the children and during the ceremony that they would all sit together," Viskupi noted, as quoted by TASR.
She served as labor and delivery nurse at Lake Forest Hospital, as a religious catechist for people with special needs at Santa Maria del Popolo Church.
A former altar boy, sacristan, and catechist, San Pedro was martyred for his faith at the young age of 17 in Tumhon, Guam on April 2, 1672 while doing missionary work along with a Spanish Jesuit priest, then the rector of the evangelization mission and now, Blessed Diego Luis de San Vitores.
After finishing his secondary education, he started formal work in the church where he was appointed a Catechist at Our Lady of the Desert in Francistown in December 1963 at the age of 26 under Father Urban Murphy who was the priest in charge.
Unheard of--except in the world that 35-year-old writer and catechist Eleanor Bourg Nicholson creates in her new novel, A Bloody Habit.
"Catholic Wisdom for a Mother's Heart" by Donna-Marie Cooper O'Boyle (who is a wife, mother of five, grandmother, blogger, catechist, EWTN TV host, and popular speaker who thoroughly enjoys her motherhood and considers it to be a sublime vocation) is a creative and practical guide for a wide range of domestic church situations.
We thought that the visit of President Muhammadu Buhari would instantly bring an end to the senseless killings by Fulani herdsmen in our state, but the killings of a Catholic catechist and two brothers barely 24 hours after his visit has clearly shown that end to these attacks may not be in sight.'