categorially

categorially

(ˌkætɪˈɡɔːrɪəlɪ)
adv
in a manner relating to or involving categories
References in periodicals archive ?
Coxs decision to categorially disregard all notices from Rightscorp provides further evidence that Cox did not reasonably implement a repeat-infringer policy.
The category of childhood also delineates the adult (adulthood) as the opposite of child, in that the category of childhood renders adults as categorially free and autonomous in contrast to children, who are vulnerable and developmental.
The general idea of the argument is that concepts possess features that make them categorially incapable of being stored in any material locus.
Verbocentric nominal compounds in Bulgarian are consistently categorially and morphologically right-headed (for inflectional purposes, including bahuvrihi compounds which lack a semantic head, e.
The need for subcategories and for a whole categorial tree was explained by the task of analysing categorially all elementary and ubiquitous phenomena and by the relationships of categories in the respective ontological theory.
7) For Bjorck, however, this low degree of conceptual integration lies primarily with the fact that the adjectival participle is categorially an adjective ('adjektiviert,' adjectivised): (8) in his opinion an expression such as ouucpepovTec, [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], Dem.
In terms of categorial structure, we can distinguish between absorptions, where the source of the base is associated with a distinct category, and incorporation, where the base is categorially constant.
The aim was to provide arguments for the construal of constructional meaning as a potential solution for the cases of categorially indistinct cases such as light verb constructions where it is only by formal linguistic force that we can impose separate syntactic or pragmatic meaning.
The reasoning of those who advocate 'pragmatic' models of the implied author then proceeds as follows: the picture of literary communication just described makes clear that the implied author, the empirical author, and the fictive narrator of a work are categorially related to one another; as this is so, and given that the author and the narrator of a text should obviously be categorized as speakers, the implied author of the text can also be seen as one.
We can perceive categorially structured objects such as states of affairs.
Forcing the analogy, that is to say, speaking of God as known transcendentally rather than categorially, creates a logical space for talking of God, even though as Holy Mystery God is still beyond our grasp and so can be spoken of only in this indirect metaphoric way.