catheter

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Related to catheter drainage: Robinson catheter

cath·e·ter

 (kăth′ĭ-tər)
n.
A hollow flexible tube for insertion into a body cavity, duct, or vessel to allow the passage of fluids or distend a passageway. Its uses include the drainage of urine from the bladder through the urethra or insertion through a blood vessel into the heart for diagnostic purposes.

[Late Latin, from Greek kathetēr, from kathīenai, kathe-, to send down : kat-, kata-, cata- + hīenai, to send; see yē- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

catheter

(ˈkæθɪtə)
n
(Medicine) med a long slender flexible tube for inserting into a natural bodily cavity or passage for introducing or withdrawing fluid, such as urine or blood
[C17: from Late Latin, from Greek kathetēr, from kathienai to send down, insert]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cath•e•ter

(ˈkæθ ɪ tər)

n.
a thin flexible tube inserted into a bodily passage, vessel, or cavity to allow fluids to pass into or out of it, to distend it, or to convey diagnostic or other instruments through it.
[1595–1605; < Late Latin < Greek kathetḗr something inserted, catheter]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

cath·e·ter

(kăth′ĭ-tər)
A thin, flexible tube inserted into a duct of the body to remove a blockage or to drain fluid.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

catheter

- A tube inserted for withdrawing bodily fluids, it comes from Greek kathienai, "send or let down."
See also related terms for tube.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

catheter


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A fine, plastic tube used in diagnostic procedures to examine internal organs and passages or as a drain to empty organs such as the bladder.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.catheter - a thin flexible tube inserted into the body to permit introduction or withdrawal of fluids or to keep the passageway open
endotracheal tube - a catheter that is inserted into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to maintain an open air passage or to deliver oxygen or to permit the suctioning of mucus or to prevent aspiration of the stomach contents
tube, tubing - conduit consisting of a long hollow object (usually cylindrical) used to hold and conduct objects or liquids or gases
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
katetri
kateter
cewnikkateter
katéter
kateter
kateter

catheter

[ˈkæθɪtəʳ] Ncatéter m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

catheter

[ˈkæθɪr] ncathéter m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

catheter

nKatheter m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

catheter

[ˈkæθɪtəʳ] n (Med) → catetere m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

cath·e·ter

n. catéter, sonda, tubo usado para drenar o introducir líquidos;
___ holderportacatéter.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

catheter

n (venous, arterial) catéter m; (urinary) sonda; central venous — catéter venoso central; epidural — catéter epidural; Foley — sonda Foley, sonda vesical; Hickman — catéter Hickman; implantable — catéter implantable; peripherally-inserted central — (PICC) catéter central de inserción periférica; pulmonary artery o Swan-Ganz — catéter de arteria pulmonar, catéter de Swan-Ganz; urinary — sonda or catéter vesical, sonda or catéter en la vejiga
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
This kind of repeated puncture is very harmful to patients, and due to the limitation of puncture means, drainage cannot be completely emptied, which may slow treatment progress and aggravate clinical symptoms.6,7 In recent years, a study has shown that central venous catheter drainage on the basis of standardized anti-tuberculosis treatment can reduce inflammation by eliminating pleural effusion quickly and early.8 Central venous catheter based closed thoracic drainage successfully overcomes the shortcomings of traditional drainage, such as time-consuming, laborious, small volume of drainage and large trauma.
The mainstay of treatment of liver abscess in the recent past has been either a percutaneous catheter drainage or percutaneous needle aspiration.
Background and Aims: Modern treatment of liver abscesses comprises combination of antibiotics and image-guided percutaneous needle aspiration (PNA) or percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD).
Role of percutaneous catheter drainage as a primary treatment for necrotizing pancreatitis
Wanted to be the doctor, Yasmeen (17) is compelled to walk with urine catheter drainage bag due to negligence of doctors in Bolan Medical Complex.
Of note, at this juncture, additional history was elicited from the patient detailing a similar episode of shortness of breath one year previously occurring in conjunction with a large pleural effusion, treated at the time with catheter drainage at an outside institution, without apparent further work-up.
Six abscesses that had fistulous communication with the gastrointestinal system were cured with prolonged catheter drainage and parenteral nutrition whereas the remaining four abscesses were accepted as failure.
Studies have been showed that the presence of multiloculated abscess lesions has been considered as one of the factors that increase the risk of percutaneous catheter drainage failure [7, 8].
The culture obtained from percutaneous catheter drainage resulted as MSSA on day two of admission.
a 12-Fr pigtail catheter drainage was chosen rather than larger bore chest tube because there were no signs of loculations or hematoma on chest CT and ultrasound and for patient comfort.