catmint


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cat·mint

 (kăt′mĭnt′)
n.
1. Any of various aromatic, ornamental plants of the genus Nepeta in the mint family, having variously colored flowers with two-lipped corollas.
2. Chiefly British Catnip.

catmint

(ˈkætˌmɪnt)
n
(Plants) a Eurasian plant, Nepeta cataria, having spikes of purple-spotted white flowers and scented leaves of which cats are fond: family Lamiaeae (labiates). Also called: catnip

cat•nip

(ˈkæt nɪp)

n.
a plant, Nepeta cataria, of the mint family, having egg-shaped leaves containing aromatic oils that are a cat attractant.
Also, esp. Brit., catmint.
[1705–15, Amer.; cat + nip, variant of Middle English nep catnip < Old English nepte < Medieval Latin nepta, variant of Latin nepeta]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.catmint - hairy aromatic perennial herb having whorls of small white purple-spotted flowers in a terminal spikecatmint - hairy aromatic perennial herb having whorls of small white purple-spotted flowers in a terminal spike; used in the past as a domestic remedy; strongly attractive to cats
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
genus Nepeta, Nepeta - catmint
Translations

catmint

[ˈkætmɪnt] Nhierba f gatera, nébeda f

catmint

[ˈkætˌmɪnt] ngattaia, nepeta
References in periodicals archive ?
It looks great when accompanied by the vigorous blue catmint, Six Hills Giant.
The trouble with garden path construction is that too often gardeners are seduced by those charming glossy magazine photographs of paths meandering through clouds of catmint, almost indistinguishable from the flower borders spilling across the fringes.
Henry Candy quipped to Chris Rutter after the jockey had brought the curtain down on his career with success aboard Catmint in the nursery, writes Simon Milham.
It combines well aesthetically with drought-tolerant plants that have violet-colored flowers, including lavender, catmint, Cleveland sage and trailing lantana.
Try devoting a sunny corner of the flower bed to feline favourites like catmint and catnip.
Try using Catmint (Nepeta x faasenii) for edging paths and borders.
I've caught them rolling around in my glorious borders of purple nepeta, otherwise known as catmint (red rag to a bull, I hear you say, but when I planted it years ago, I had no idea it would be such a moggie magnet), using my trees and shrubs as scratching posts and using a variety of areas of the garden to do their business.
If the space is sunny, plant a mix of vibrant perennials such as catmint, lavender, lion's tail, penstemon, and Santa Barbara daisy.
Catmint makes a terrific edging plant for the border instead of lavender, its greygreen leaves and lavender flowerhead borne on upright spikes.
Expert tip: The reflected heat from walkways also suits lavender, catmint or nepeta and alchemilla or lady's mantle, which are more exuberant and will spill over the path when in flower.
Two pretty beds of pale pink Felicity roses are underplanted with the hazy, blue catmint 'Six Hills Giant' and the border immediately below the castle walls is planted with white flowers highlighted with pink.
MAJOR flower shows have been awash with catmint this year, its mass of purple flowers on low soft spikes ideal for the front of a colourful border, making a welcome change from lavender, although its smell isn't as pleasant.