cattle egret

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cattle egret

n.
A small egret (Bubulcus ibis) that feeds among grazing cattle. It is native to Africa and southern Eurasia but is now found worldwide.

cat′tle e′gret


n.
a small egret of pastures and roadsides, Bubulcus ibis, orig. of Eurasia and Africa and now common in the New World.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cattle egret - small white egret widely distributed in warm regions often found around grazing animals
egret - any of various usually white herons having long plumes during breeding season
Bubulcus, genus Bubulcus - small white egrets
Translations
garcilla bueyera
airone guardabuoi
kuhegre
References in periodicals archive ?
On Anglesey, four Cattle Egrets were again at Pont Marquis, near the Cefni estuary and eight Barnacle Geese are feeding near Llyn Trafwll, perhaps part of the Dyfi estuary flock that are starting to make their way back to their Cumbrian breeding lakes.
Abstract: We determined the pharmacokinetic properties of ceftiofur crystalline-free acid (CCFA), a long-acting antibiotic, after a single intramuscular injection in cattle egrets (Bubulcus ibis).
Growth and development of temperature regulation in nestling cattle egrets.
This was the first cattle egret spotted in these parts for a good number of years though the sight of cattle egrets in Cleveland could one day become a regular occurrence.
Based on results it was concluded that Cattle egrets are colonial breeders and colonies were monospecific with no other ardeidae members nesting in the neighborhood.
Little Egrets, Cattle Egrets, Blackcrowned Night Herons, Squacco Herons, a Purple Heron and even a Little Green Heron flaunted themselves.
There are only few reports of crested caracara hunting waterbirds white ibis (Eudocimus albus; weight 750-1050 g; Bent 1938), cattle egrets (Bubulcus ibis; weight 270512 g; Layne et al.
Cattle Egrets preferred farmlands but also inhabited marshes.
The objectives of this study are to evaluate reproductive success of Black-crowned Night-Herons (Nycticorax nycticorax), Great Blue Herons (Ardea herodias), Cattle Egrets (Bubulcus ibis), Great Egrets (Ardea alba), Snowy Egrets (Egretta thula), and Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) in wetlands and rivers of northeast South Dakota by determining nest and fledging success and evaluating local and landscape level habitat variables that affect nest success.
They move slowly, often accompanied by cattle egrets or tagak in a symbiotic relationship: As they move through the grass, they disturb the insects which the egrets love.
The present communication encompasses the main objective to gather a firsthand information regarding the nest and various nidification activities such as the number of hours of labour for nest construction, the type and amount of nesting material collected during the busy hours of nidification, average time spent in gathering sticks for nest building, average time to carry the nesting material from its source to the nest, nest inspection and rearrangement activities by nest occupants to determine the role of both sexes of Cattle Egrets (Bubulcus ibis coromandus) in Jammu as virtually nothing has been reported pertaining to these aspects of the bird from the study area.