cauda

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Related to cauda equina: Cauda equina syndrome

cauda

(ˈkɔːdə)
n
1. (Zoology) zoology the area behind the anus of an animal; tail
2. (Anatomy) anatomy
a. any tail-like structure
b. the posterior part of an organ
[Latin: tail]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cauda - any taillike structure
anatomical structure, bodily structure, body structure, complex body part, structure - a particular complex anatomical part of a living thing; "he has good bone structure"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The findings of examination vary depending on the location of the SEL, thoracic or lumbar (spinal cord, conus medullaris, and cauda equina).
If the capsule ruptures or the tumour is not confined to the filum terminale, the mass could infiltrate and adhere to the cauda equina and/or conus medullaris or disseminate via the cerebral spinal fluid.
She was rushed to The Walton Centre, a neurosciences unit, where she was diagnosed with cauda equina syndrome, a neurological disorder where the discs compress the spinal nerves.
Hubbard diagnosed Karen with cauda equina syndrome, a neurological condition caused by compression of the nerves in the lower part of the spinal canal which can result in permanent lower-body pain and loss of bowel and bladder control.
The hospital staff suspected cauda equina syndrome and consulted a neurologist, who concluded that the patient didn't have the condition.
This is a diverse group including meningocoele, lipoma of the cauda equina, dermal sinus and so on.
Large lesions may present as neurogenic claudication or sphincter dysfunction, such as seen in cauda equina syndrome.
Irreversible events--which are very rare but have led to cases of paralysis and death--include cauda equina syndrome, which sometimes can be reversed with prompt surgery, and vascular injury, primarily to the vertebrobasilar arteries.