causal


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

caus·al

 (kô′zəl)
adj.
1. Of, involving, or constituting a cause: a causal relationship between scarcity of goods and higher prices.
2. Indicative of or expressing a cause.
n.
A word or grammatical element, such as since or because, expressing a cause or reason.

caus′al·ly adv.

causal

(ˈkɔːzəl)
adj
1. acting as or being a cause
2. stating, involving, or implying a cause: the causal part of the argument.
3. (Philosophy) philosophy (of a theory) explaining a phenomenon or analysing a concept in terms of some causal relation
ˈcausally adv

caus•al

(ˈkɔ zəl)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to a cause.
2. expressing a cause, as the conjunctions because and since.
[1520–30; < Latin]
caus′al•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.causal - involving or constituting a cause; causing; "a causal relationship between scarcity and higher prices"
causative - producing an effect; "poverty as a causative factor in crime"
Translations
kauzálnípříčinný

causal

[ˈkɔːzəl] ADJcausal

causal

[ˈkɔːzəl] adj [link, relationship, connection] → causal(e)

causal

adjkausal, ursächlich; causal relationshipKausalzusammenhang m

causal

[ˈkɔːzl] adjcausale

causal

a. causal.
References in classic literature ?
A beginning is that which does not itself follow anything by causal necessity, but after which something naturally is or comes to be.
He is a beholder of ideas and an utterer of the necessary and causal.
It is possible to understand that Napoleon had power and so events occurred; with some effort one may even conceive that Napoleon together with other influences was the cause of an event; but how a book, Le Contrat social, had the effect of making Frenchmen begin to drown one another cannot be understood without an explanation of the causal nexus of this new force with the event.
Genius studies the causal thought, and far back in the womb of things sees the rays parting from one orb, that diverge, ere they fall, by infinite diameters.
There are, it seems to me, prima facie different kinds of causal laws, one belonging to physics and the other to psychology.
Yet when participants were involved in measure selection and viewed the balanced scorecard as a causal chain, they exhibited no tendency to favor an initiative that they had selected (see Figure 4).
Causal graphs encode the specific mechanistic system that can be expressed as nonparametric structural equations that are at the core of the research question and present a graphical analog to epidemiologic concepts such as confounding, selection bias, and direct/indirect causal effects.
But psychological scientist Marc Buehner of Cardiff University, UK wondered whether temporal binding might be rooted in a more general capacity to understand causal relations.
The ability to identify causal variants from the output of a whole genome or exome sequencing experiment remains a major bottleneck in making scientific discoveries and realizing the value of NGS sequencing.
Courts often held that patent infringement did not occur in the course of advertising so there was no causal connection; and that an insurer has no duty to defend such lawsuits.
Brady and David Collier (2004), contains a broad spectrum of arguments in favor of distinct tools for generating causal inference in small-N studies.