causation

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cau·sa·tion

 (kô-zā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of causing.
2. A cause.
3. Causality.

causation

(kɔːˈzeɪʃən)
n
1. the act or fact of causing; the production of an effect by a cause
2. the relationship of cause and effect
cauˈsational adj

cau•sa•tion

(kɔˈzeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act or fact of causing.
2. the relation of cause to effect; causality.
3. anything that produces an effect; cause.
[1640–50; < Medieval Latin]
cau•sa′tion•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.causation - the act of causing something to happen
human action, human activity, act, deed - something that people do or cause to happen
sending - the act of causing something to go (especially messages)
trigger, initiation, induction - an act that sets in motion some course of events
coercion, compulsion - using force to cause something to occur; "though pressed into rugby under compulsion I began to enjoy the game"; "they didn't have to use coercion"
influence - causing something without any direct or apparent effort
inducing, inducement - act of bringing about a desired result; "inducement of sleep"
Translations

causation

[kɔːˈzeɪʃən] Ncausalidad f

causation

nKausalität f; (of particular event)Ursache f; the law of causationdas Kausalgesetz or -prinzip
References in periodicals archive ?
Department of Justice Environment & Natural Resources Division in Denver, wrote that the Federal Circuit ruled that a lower court's causation analysis must consider the impact of the entirety of the government's actions.
The question is what the appropriate causation analysis should be.
Where, as here, each plaintiff took one of only several commercially available doses, clinical data exist that enable an expert to perform a causation analysis at each dose, and experts confirm a relationship between dosage and harm, the district court doesn't abuse its discretion in asking the expert to produce a dose-by-dose analysis.<br />Additionally, because Singh failed to find a statistically significant relationship between Lipitor and diabetes at certain doses, the district court reasonably found that he should not have applied the Bradford Hill factors at the second step.<br />Statistical significance may bear on the question of reliability and must therefore be subjected to the same inquiry as any other scientific evidence.
not simply picked up the right causation analysis and moved it over into
The court will be asked to determine whether "the gap" between the studies' conclusions and the plaintiff's illness is "too wide." When "ruling in" the defendant's product as a potential cause of the plaintiff's illness, therefore, the plaintiff's expert should be required to provide a robust, transparent and reproducible general causation analysis.
This paper is organized as follows: Section 2 reviews the related literature on causation analysis of road accidents; Section 3 describes the construction of a Bayesian network model; Section 4 presents a case study on Bayesian network model application for Adelaide Central Business District (CBD) in South Australia; the findings of this study are summarized in Section 5.
2014), available at http://www.wileyrein.com/newsroom-newsletters-item5093.html (suggesting that although not every circuit has followed the Sweet Home proximate causation analysis, including the 9th and 11th circuits, Aransas Project may still be persuasive).
He further observes, "Moreover, in a discipline hungry for facts and evidence, machine intelligence is likely to ease the administration of demanding legal standards, such as counterfactual analysis, price-cost tests, and causation analysis. Lastly, the rise of machine intelligence may bring new professionals into the competition field and create new educational challenges for competition lawyers and economists."
In the last five years, he has been directly involved with forensic investigations and inspections for building damage causation analysis, providing technical expertise and working closely with insurance carriers and attorneys regarding conflict resolution.
This is known as the "loss of a chance" doctrine, which has been variously considered a part of causation analysis, a separate tort, or a means to apportion damages.
Incidentally, once these correlations are established, they can then be used to help improve causation analysis.