cause célèbre

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cause cé·lè·bre

 (kôz′ sə-lĕb′, kōz′ sā-lĕb′rə)
n. pl. causes cé·lè·bres (kôz′ sə-lĕb′, kōz′ sā-lĕb′rə)
1. An issue arousing widespread controversy or heated public debate.
2. A celebrated legal case.

[French : cause, case + célèbre, celebrated.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cause célèbre

(ˈkɔːz səˈlɛbrə; -ˈlɛb; French koz selɛbrə)
n, pl causes célèbres (ˈkɔːz səˈlɛbrəz; -ˈlɛb; ˈkɔːzɪz səˈlɛbrə; -ˈlɛbz; French koz selɛbrə)
(Communications & Information) a famous lawsuit, trial, or controversy
[C19: from French: famous case]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cause cé•lè•bre

(ˈkɔz səˈlɛb; Fr. koʊz seɪˈlɛb rə)

n., pl. causes cé•lè•bres (ˈkɔz səˈlɛb; Fr. koʊz seɪˈlɛb rə)
any controversy that attracts great public attention.
[1755–65; < French: literally, famous case]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

cause célèbre

A French phrase meaning famous case, used to refer to any matter or issue that arouses great public interest or controversy.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cause celebre - an incident that attracts great public attention
incident - a single distinct event
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

cause célèbre

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
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cause celebre nothing is found to show whether the offenders braved the punishment, or departed forthwith out of that inhospitable jurisdiction.
"It's difficult to say what it is, but it may yet be a CAUSE CELEBRE," said the Assistant Commissioner.
BARCELONA, SPAIN When overtourism became a cause celebre in 2017-18, Barcelona was its unwilling poster child.
Academic Dems more than others love to hang faculty gowns on this cause celebre. But a state for the Palestinian Arabs is foolishness writ large.
Korean War veteran Earl Stone (Eastwood) used to be a cause celebre in horticultural circles, but he failed to move with the times by investing in an online marketplace for his gold medal-winning lilies.
It also became a cause celebre for Osama bin Laden and one of the factors that led to al-Qaida's attacks against the U.S.
Butterfly' is based on the intriguing real-life espionage love affair between a French diplomat and a Chinese opera singer that was the cause celebre of France in 1986.
Amateur opera singer Florence became a cause celebre in 1930s and 1940s New York - because she was unable to hold a note during her infamous recitals.
Ponsati has understandably become a cause celebre in Scottish nationalist circles.
The story added:"The 'Bwgan Pant-y-Wennol' became something of a cause celebre, but there are doubts as to whether the haunting was real or a malicious hoax."
The Polanski case remains an international cause celebre nearly four decades after the crime, with some demanding harsh punishment and others urging that extradition efforts be dropped.
Why a Nigerian cleric is Hezbollah's new cause celebre Sheikh Ibrahim al-Zakzaky single-handedly brought Shiite Islamism to Nigeria.