causeway


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Related to causeway: Giant's Causeway

cause·way

 (kôz′wā′)
n.
1. A roadway on a raised bed of earth, rubble, or other fill, usually crossing open water or a wetland.
2. A long bridge consisting of many short spans.
3. Archaic A paved highway.

[Middle English caucewei : cauce, raised road (from Norman French caucie, from Medieval Latin calciāta (via), paved (road), from Latin calx, calc-, limestone; see calx) + wei, road (variant of way; see way).]

causeway

(ˈkɔːzˌweɪ)
n
1. (Civil Engineering) a raised path or road crossing water, marshland, sand, etc
2. (Human Geography) a paved footpath
3. (Civil Engineering) a road surfaced with setts
[C15 cauciwey (from cauci + way); cauci paved road, from Medieval Latin (via) calciāta, calciātus paved with limestone, from Latin calx limestone]

cause•way

(ˈkɔzˌweɪ)

n.
a raised road, as over wet ground or a body of water.
[1400–50; late Middle English cawcewey (see way1), Middle English cauce < Anglo-French, Old North French caucie(e) < Late Latin (via) calciāta (road) paved with limestone]

causeway

- A raised path, road, or way across a wet place or stretch of water—based on causey, "a mound, embankment, or dam to retain water."
See also related terms for mound.

causeway

A craft similar in design to a barge, but longer and narrower, designed to assist in the discharge and transport of cargo from vessels. See also barge; watercraft.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.causeway - a road that is raised above water or marshland or sandcauseway - a road that is raised above water or marshland or sand
road, route - an open way (generally public) for travel or transportation
Verb1.causeway - provide with a causeway; "A causewayed swamp"
furnish, provide, supply, render - give something useful or necessary to; "We provided the room with an electrical heater"
2.causeway - pave a road with cobblestones or pebbles
pave - cover with a material such as stone or concrete to make suitable for vehicle traffic; "pave the roads in the village"
Translations
násepzvýšená lávka
upphækkaîur vegur/stígur
sankasa
dambisuzbērts ceļš
zvýšená cesta
yükseltilmiş yol

causeway

[ˈkɔːzweɪ] Ncalzada f or carretera f elevada; (in sea) → arrecife m

causeway

[ˈkɔːzweɪ] nchaussée f (surélevée)

causeway

nDamm m

causeway

[ˈkɔːzˌweɪ] nstrada rialzata

causeway

(ˈkoːzwei) noun
a raised pathway, road etc over wet ground or shallow water.
References in classic literature ?
At the end of a walk of about ten minutes among the tents and posts, which were closer together near the headquarters, Monk entered upon a little causeway which diverged into three branches.
I remember the remains of one upon an island in a small lake near Lerwick, which at high tide communicates with the sea, the access to which is very ingenious, by means of a causeway or dike, about three or four inches under the surface of the water.
Gathering my mantle about me, and sheltering my hands in my muff, I did not feel the cold, though it froze keenly; as was attested by a sheet of ice covering the causeway, where a little brooklet, now congealed, had overflowed after a rapid thaw some days since.
At length we descried a light and a roof, and presently afterwards ran alongside a little causeway made of stones that had been picked up hard by.
Along the causeway rode a knight with a score of stout men-at-arms behind him.
advancing to me eagerly along the causeway seemed the very sprite of Alastor himself
He was pacing homewards along the causeway, and did not turn his head.
On stormy nights it shows the exact entrance to the water causeway.
When he saw my horse's breast fairly pushing the barrier, he did put out his hand to unchain it, and then sullenly preceded me up the causeway, calling, as we entered the court, - 'Joseph, take Mr.
We may say it only seemed like an island, because a second glance revealed a low causeway of flat stones running up to it from the shore and turning it into a peninsula.
Her cheeks never grew a shade deeper when his name was mentioned; she felt no thrill when she saw him passing along the causeway by the window, or advancing towards her unexpectedly in the footpath across the meadow; she felt nothing, when his eyes rested on her, but the cold triumph of knowing that he loved her and would not care to look at Mary Burge.
Even on the causeway forming the fortifications of Tycho, the mountains hanging on to the interior and exterior sloping flanks rose in stories like gigantic terraces.