causticity


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

caus·tic

 (kô′stĭk)
adj.
1. Capable of burning, corroding, dissolving, or eating away by chemical action.
2. Sarcastic or cutting; biting: "The caustic jokes ... deal with such diverse matters as political assassination, talk-show hosts, medical ethics" (Frank Rich).
3. Given to making caustic remarks: a caustic TV commentator.
n.
1. A caustic material or substance.
2. A hydroxide of a light metal.
3. The enveloping surface formed by light rays reflecting or refracting from a curved surface, especially one with spherical aberration.

[Middle English caustik, from Latin causticus, from Greek kaustikos, from kaustos, from kaiein, kau-, to burn.]

caus′ti·cal·ly adv.
caus·tic′i·ty (kô-stĭs′ĭ-tē) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

causticism, causticity

a sharp, tart wittiness. Also causticness. — caustic, adj.
See also: Language Style
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

causticity

noun
Irony or bitterness, as of tone:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Deane, he considered, was the "knowingest" man of his acquaintance, and he had besides a ready causticity of tongue that made an agreeable supplement to Mr.
Not that the former Fierce One is a stranger to acerbity and causticity. In his incarnation as Maoist supremo, Dahal would routinely rail against individuals (i.e.
To choose the color coated steel coil according to its use, causticity of service environment, service life and durability.